Should I break quarantine??

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by katiechicknlady, Dec 18, 2013.

  1. katiechicknlady

    katiechicknlady New Egg

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    Sep 18, 2013
    Greeley, CO
    We got a Silver Duckwing Bantam Roo, Cogburn, on the evening of 12/14. 2 days after we got him, he started showing signs of what I can only assume is a Respiratory illness. Clear liquid coming from his eyes, nostrils and beak, though seemingly only in the afternoon/evening? In the mornings and throughout most of the day, he eats, drinks, crows, and has clear eyes and airways. He is co-owned with a friend, who feels that Cogburn is going through separation anxiety, and has asked that we put one of our Banty Duckwing hens (also co-owned) in with Cogburn. To be honest, I thought yesterday was curtains for the little guy, around roosting time he had so much goo coming out of his mouth and nostrils that he horribly sounded like he was drowning in it. It was tremendously upsetting to both Cogburn (obviously) and myself. I have yogurt in there for him, and have been adding ACV to his water and he's staying the back room of our house, so he's nice and warm...but I really feel like this an infection of some kind, and am beyond hesitant to put a healthy chicken in there with him. Especially as it will eventually raise the question of infecting all of my hens even if Cogburn and the hen in question do survive...because we will need to put them somewhere. Ugh!
    So, I guess my question is...does anyone have any input? I couldn't find an obvious precedent online for the separation anxiety theory, though I do understand that they are flock animals and don't like going solo like this. And I'm not sure why right now he seems completely healthy and relaxed, if not maybe a bit lethargic. But later today I'll probably be near in tears again watching him fight to breathe. And lastly, would it stress him out more to add a bird he's never met to the small quarantine enclosure?
    Thanks so much for reading, anything input/thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I think you are very smart not to put healthy chickens in with a new rooster who is obviously sick. That is the reason to always quarantine a new chicken for at least 30 days. Mycoplasma G (CRD) infectious bronchitis, laryngotracheitis, coryza and other diseases almost always have eye or nasal drainage, or both, as a symptom. He could be tested by your state vet or NPIP official, and he might respond to Tylan50 injections or one of the oral antibiotics, but he could still carry it to the rest of your flock. Here is a list of those diseases with symptoms: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2013
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I agree.

    Personally, I wouldn't introduce him into your flock. Chickens will be carriers of respiratory diseases for their whole lives, so your whole flock would have the disease eventually, even if they didn't show any symptoms of it.
     
  4. katiechicknlady

    katiechicknlady New Egg

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    Sep 18, 2013
    Greeley, CO
    Thanks for the input, I really appreciate it!
    We contacted the breeder, who said 'of course he has mycoplasma, all of my chickens do. It's so common I never tell people.'
    After talking to a number of vets & experienced farming people, it seems that most people agree that she wasn't in the wrong to not inform us. But I'm pretty upset, it seems very irresponsible.
     
  5. pwand

    pwand Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I hate to suggest this, could you take him back?
     
  6. katiechicknlady

    katiechicknlady New Egg

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    Sep 18, 2013
    Greeley, CO
    The co-owner/friend really wants to breed the Duckwings. He's looking at the birds as livestock, whereas I see them as pets. He won't take the Roo back to the breeder, but he may be able to find another home and is looking. I'm trying to decide how likely it is that my girls already have mycoplasma, since apparently it's much more common than I had understood. They do free range and mix among wild sparrows, and several neighbors have chickens as well. I heard the figure of 85% of backyard flocks have mycoplasma! But in the meantime I'm being extra crazy careful about changing my clothes and washing my hands when I take care of any of the birds, assuming the girls don't have it. We did get the little guy on medication and he's been doing better...so I got that going for me;)
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    You might want to tell your friend that mycoplasma gets passed on through hatching eggs. So if he chooses to breed birds that might have it, and sells them, it is a bit unethical. I wouldn't mix sick birds with my healthy birds no matter what. Unless you get a bird tested with a nasal swab you can't know what they have. Here are a couple of links to read:
    http://umaine.edu/livestock/poultry/mycoplasma-gallisepticum-faq/
    http://www.merckmanuals.com/vet/pou...lasma_gallisepticum_infection_in_poultry.html
     

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