Should I get a pair of Welsummers?

Discussion in 'Managing Your Flock' started by texaschickmama, Nov 1, 2007.

  1. texaschickmama

    texaschickmama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Poolville, TX
    I know you guys are all going to say yes, but wait just a minute. I really want a variety of colored eggs. I have a flock consisting of 14 BO that are 17 wks. I have on one Buff Rock roo that is probably going into the soup bowl because he is being mean to my girls. Anyway, I don't have a separate place to put them for now. I know you have to quarantine for like 30 days to be safe. I could rig something with my huge watering trough with something on top. What do you guys think? Oh, and they are the same age as my BO flock, 4 months. So, do I get the pair? Maybe I am just trying to convince myself. Should I wait for Spring or should I get them since they are the same age. I have one BO roo, Caesar, would he get along with the Welsummer roo? I love roos, the BR roo, Gumbo, is just not acting right around my girls, and I'm thinking that since Caesar was raised with them, he would treat them better than Gumbo does. Give me some suggestions. PLEASE. [​IMG]

    Would the Welsummer personality go with my sweet BOs?
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2007
  2. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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    Should I get a pair of Welsummers?

    Yes.

    Their eggs are gorgeous. Mine get along very well in the flock. [​IMG]
     
  3. texaschickmama

    texaschickmama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Poolville, TX
    Should I separate them? For how long? 30 days seems long to me.
     
  4. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Forks, Virginia
    You really should find a away to keep them very far away from your own chickens for 30 days. Not only does this prevent something the new bird might carry from infecting your birds it also keeps the new bird safe from something your chickens carry.

    Not every thing our chickens have is disease but different environments promote different immunities in the birds. What your birds are immune to the new bird might not be and vice versa.

    If you are willing to accept sickness and death of any of the birds it is a risk you take by putting the new chicken directly in contact with your own birds.

    If you can just rig up a large dog crate or one of the rubbermaid type tubs for the new bird to into at night and a small yard you are really doing a preventative measure and keeping the biosecurity of your flock at its highest level.

    I know many people just put the birds in together and everything seems to be fine but then there are the cases when many birds get sick and a big number of the flock are dead and dying.

    It is a risk I am not willing to take.

    I would really like to see speckledhen chime here on this post. I believe she one time had a problem in her flock. If I am incorrect I apologize. It is just that her name immediately comes to mind in this subject.

    The cheerleader in me is saying "get the Welsummer!" They have such lovely dark eggs and the birds are gorgeous to look at.
     
  5. texaschickmama

    texaschickmama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Poolville, TX
    Thanks, Miss Prissy, for the advice. You are right. I should take every measure to keep my girls and guys safe and disease free. I would just feel bad keeping them in a "cage" for a month. What about heat? would they be fine with some pine shavings on the bottom of the dog crate (a big one, the black wire type.) I would wrap chicken wire around the crate with horse panels around too, so they would not get pulled through. Hmmmmmmmmmmm, now to convince my husband, or maybe I should just go get them, then he can't say no. [​IMG]
     
  6. DuckLady

    DuckLady Administrator Staff Member

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    Miss Prissy is right on. Do separate them. I had mine as a baby with a bunch of other chicks, so separation was not needed. Better safe than sorry. [​IMG]
     
  7. jeaucamom

    jeaucamom Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oct 1, 2007
    Ophir, CA
    Question here.... Are you medicating both bird flocks while they are separated? Because if either one or both flocks are carriers of some illness, it doesn't matter how long you separate them, when you integrate the non-exposed flock will get what the other ones are carrying, even if there are no signs of illness. Does that make sense????
     
  8. texaschickmama

    texaschickmama Chillin' With My Peeps

    Sep 19, 2007
    Poolville, TX
    No, at the moment I am not medicating my BOs. I have never medicated them. Do I need to? I have not yet gotten the Welsummers, but that is a good point of giving them some preventative antibiotic. Now, what should I give them? Sorry for so many questions, I just want to get this right. [​IMG]
     
  9. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Giving antibiotics to healthy birds can lead to super bacteria that are immune to the drugs made to kill them.

    If your birds are not sick please do not medicate them.
     
  10. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I agree to separating them for 30 days. There was recently a member who did follow that procedure, but the acquired birds showed disease after the 30 day period, rare, but not unheard-of. Thirty days is the minimum. My only bird I ever purchased was quarantined for about 35 days and I'm very glad I did. A large wire dog kennel works well for that.
    Never give "preventative" antibiotics. Your birds will begin building immunity and when/if they really become ill, the antibiotics you would normally use may not work as well as they should.
    I don't own Welsummers myself so I can't really comment on their personality. My friend Lynn has them and I have never thought of them as aggressive birds at all.
     

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