Should I let her associate with the main flock?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Luckybaby, Jan 19, 2015.

  1. Luckybaby

    Luckybaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My female chicken was born on June last year, and she was a free range chicken during her first 5 to 6 weeks of life. She was the most active, and one of the biggest chick in the clutch during her first few days of life. Five to six days after she hatch, I noticed that she have a slightly hard time swallowing food and water, but after those days, she ate and drink normally. When she was about 4 weeks old, she is about half the size of her brothers and sisters, and I noticed her stretching her neck and opening her mouth several times every minute, even at night time. There are no other symptoms, such as blood on the mouth. I researched about it, and I thought, that she have gapeworm. About 1 day after she first showed the symptoms, I wormed her with a drug, that contains praziquantel and oxfendazole. However, 4 days after her first dose, she doesn't appear to be improving. So, I decided to deworm her with noromectin( generic brand of ivermectin). About 68 hours after receiving her first ivermectin dosage, she doesn't show those symptoms anymore. I actually tried to deworm her with praziquantel and oxfendazole for 4 days consecutively and 2 consecutive days of ivermectin, before she doesn't show the symptoms. I continued to worm her with ivermectin 7 times within 10 day period.

    She slept on the ground with her siblings, when she showed those symptoms, but all of them didn't have those symptoms, and neither all of my chickens, even though, they continued to sleep on the same spot about 3-4weeks after she showed those symptoms. Today, she is about 20% smaller than her tallest sister, and she is about the same size as her other sisters. I wormed her with albendazole, 4 days ago for 3 days consecutively and I change the newspaper under her cage 2 times a week.

    Should I let her associate with the main flock? Gapeworms have indirect and direct lifecycle. Also, I want to know how efficient is ivermectin and albendazole on controlling gapeworms, Please provide a link.
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2015
  2. Outpost JWB

    Outpost JWB Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She has shown these signs basically since birth (June)? Gapeworm is very uncommon. I would think if it were gapeworm, she would have already died. And unless you kept her totally isolated from the others and the others never free ranged where she was, they too would have contracted them.

    What breed is she and are the others the same breed?

    Could just be a defect in her oesophagus or crop.

    @dawg53 is a worm expert. [​IMG] Dawg, what is your take on this situation please?
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Albendazole (Valbazen) as well as Ivermectin are both effective against gapeworm and they are not hard to get rid of with normal dosing. Your bird has had an awful lot of dewormer given her in her short life. Gapeworm is not very common and since your bird started showing symptoms at such a young age most likely there is something else going on with her. I would be looking at her crop for one thing, check her in the mornings before she's eaten anything and see if it's emptying over night like it should. They can be born with defects or anomalies, things just don't work they way they should and you see a slow or stunted growth rate.

    So how is her behavior these days? Is she out and about, active, eating/drinking like a normal chicken?
     
  4. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    If it were gapeworm, the hen wouldve been dead long ago.
     
  5. Luckybaby

    Luckybaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She only has those symptoms for 8 days. I am sure, that her mom likes to hunt for bugs and give it to them, so she could have eaten the infected one, 2 weeks before she showed those symptoms. Gapeworm becomes adult 14 days after swallowing infective larvae, either from intermediate host or directly from the ground etc. She was 4 to 5 weeks old, when she showed those symptoms. Everything else it normal, including the amount of water and food that she eats, and the emptying of her crop, before and after she showed those signs. She only have a slightly hard time swallowing food and water, when she was 4 and/or 5 and 6 days old, but after that, she drinks and eat food normally. During those times, she doesn't repeated stretch her neck and breath several times. She is about 7 months old now. Unlike before, when she looks sick, she is 40- 50% smaller than her brothers and sisters, but now, she is only 10-20% smaller than her sister.

    I just want to know the efficiency of albendazole and ivermectin. If it is not 100%, then I might not take the risk of getting my other chickens infected.
     
  6. Luckybaby

    Luckybaby Chillin' With My Peeps

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    She only showed those signs for 8 days, when she was 4-5 weeks old. Since I put their litter on the garbage, when she have those symptoms, and they are free range, then it is unlikely that her siblings can eat one of the infective eggs of gapeworm. Her crop empties normally, after she hatched.

    I don't know the symptoms of defective esophagus and trachea. Do you have a link for it?
     
  7. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    A lot of time has passed and your bird has been given enough dewormer to kill just about anything she might have had. If by chance she did have gapeworm last summer then it's in the environment and your other birds are susceptible regardless of whether you put this bird in with them or not.
     

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