should I medicate chicks that carry CAMPYLOBACTER?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by hermiesbirdies, Dec 24, 2009.

  1. hermiesbirdies

    hermiesbirdies Out Of The Brooder

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    I got a bout with campylobacter that from all indications came from my chicks. I am reticent to medicate them when it is not in their best interest. Should I medicate them to get rid of CAMPY?
     
  2. purpletree23

    purpletree23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Did a doctor diagnose you by taking a sample of stool? Are you sure it was campylobacter?
     
  3. hermiesbirdies

    hermiesbirdies Out Of The Brooder

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    :)yes. I had the doctor do it. he was going to chock it up to diverticulitus or a bacteria of unknown origin, but I asked for it. smiling he asked if I knew how he had to get it.

    so it was confirmed and the health department called me.

    and what I explained to the health department was that I had eaten out with family but that I didnt have chicken and we had all shared our meals and no one else was sick. but I had handled some chickens.


    so again, I am fairly certain I got campy from them. I have had them a month before I got this, and if I am careful with washing after, should I medicate my birds to get rid of this? they are layers, but not old enough to lay yet, so I wont have any eggs to toss out.
    [​IMG]
     
  4. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    There are so many other sources where one can pick up this bug that I'd have a vet perform a fecal culture. At the very least you'd know for sure and not be wasting money on meds.
     
  5. hermiesbirdies

    hermiesbirdies Out Of The Brooder

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    so, again I ask the question. If my birds do in fact carry campylobacter, should I treat them for it?

    and thank you, good tips.
     
  6. purpletree23

    purpletree23 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Personally I wouldn't. I would just make sure to wash your hands more thoroughly after tending or holding the chicks.
     
  7. fancbrd4me02

    fancbrd4me02 Chillin' With My Peeps

    You should have the birds tested to make sure that they are the source. I have seen where camphlobacter was found on doorknobs, telephones, etc. from human contamination.
     
  8. sonew123

    sonew123 Poultry Snuggie

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    I got that 5 years ago and had to be hospitalized for 5 days! talk about sick-CDC and dept of health got invovled-I did not have chickens back then but I did get it from chicken! I was cooking for July 4th party-Im the bbqer and I always wash really good after handling meat but either I caught it from one of the kids touching something I ate from not washing there hands( grossss) or I must have not wshed thouroughly enough. Either way it sucked! I would not vacc-my birds I would just double my washing techniques around them after handling...
     
  9. hermiesbirdies

    hermiesbirdies Out Of The Brooder

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    well I had the runs, but lost my appetite and was drinking gatorade and water to keep hydrated. it went on for 3 days before I went to the doc. i had been running a lowgrade fever for the three days 99-101.

    I have had bouts of diverticulitus and the doc suspected that might be it, but we cultured it and it was campy.


    You hear so much about salmonella from improperly prepared chicken, or improper cleaning, so I figured most chickens werent medicated or treated.


    I just have to stop being lazy and wash EVERY time.


    thank you guys and gals. I will keep reading the thread for other opinions
     
  10. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    If the chooks are confirmed to be the source, then, yes, the vet might even write an off-label script for Baytril for your flock.

    Though usually a low grade (can interfere with wt./general health) insult to the well being of adult chooks, Camp. is pretty unforgiving in chicks and, again, getting the lab work done is the only way to know for sure (cheapest/safest in the long run).

    Good luck!
     

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