Show/Broody Bantams

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by poultryluvr18, May 25, 2012.

  1. poultryluvr18

    poultryluvr18 In the Brooder

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    I have a question for anybody that can give me information or an opinion! What I would like is a bantam breed that does well in winter in Idaho (usually snow, wind, mud), looks fancy, goes broody (I want them to hatch out all my chicks in the Spring), isn't overly aggresive (I want to have a roo), and does well with other standard size chickens. I really like Silkies and d'Uccle's, but I'm not sure if they'd do well in winter where I am. They will have a nice dry coop to stay in, but they also have a large outdoor run to go in if they want. Thanks in advance for your help!
     
  2. juliechick

    juliechick Transplanted Hillbilly

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    I think the Silkies and d'Uccles would do fine as long as they have a dry coop to go into. Also, Cochins would be a good breed of bantam. If you don't want feather legged breeds, then look into Wyandotte Bantams. They have a rose comb that is better for colder climates.
     
  3. Wolftalk

    Wolftalk Songster

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    The Coop :)
    Sebrights do well almost anywhere. I have 6 sebrights and they do fine with other chickens and are fairly hardy. (as long as you have a shelter for them at night.) People say they dont go broody, but I have a 9 month old broody on 9 eggs right now, so they will go broody. (liked all chickens its on thier own terms though, ha ha) my rooster can be aggressive occasionally, but dont worry, they wont be a problem as long as they have enough space. They are good producers, I get an egg a day from each of my hens, not to mention they are kind of rare, and very pretty! Hope that helped! you can check out my page for pics too.
     
  4. poultryluvr18

    poultryluvr18 In the Brooder

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    Feb 26, 2011
    Okay thanks both of you! I think I'd really like to do the d'Uccles or Cochins, depending on what I can get my hands on [​IMG] Since I'd like to breed them for show, is there anything I should look for specifically when I choose them? I mean, I know about all the standard bright eyes, active, smooth feathers and stuff, but as far as feathering or shape or anything? Thank you so much!!!
     
  5. juliechick

    juliechick Transplanted Hillbilly

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    It would be helpful to get a copy of the Standard of Perfection. In fact, if you're serious about showing, you really need one. The bantam costs about $35.00.

    There is an enormous difference between show quality and non-show quality Cochins, for example. Show quality Cochins look like a feather covered bowling ball. Hopefully, you can find a breeder that will give you some advice and sell you some good quality birds to start out with. Good luck!
     
  6. poultryluvr18

    poultryluvr18 In the Brooder

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    I have a Standard of Perfection, I just like to get other people's opinions as well. I've found a breeder that I think will give me some good birds. I think I'm deciding between Mille Fleur d'Uccles, and Partridge Cochins. How do you tell if your cochin has vulture hocks? I've got a couple right now (not very good quality though), and I'm not sure if they do. Are the feathers the same as all the others or are they different? How do you distiguish them from regular feathers on their legs? I had a show judge explain it to me once, but I kinda forgot...
     
  7. juliechick

    juliechick Transplanted Hillbilly

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    A picture is worth 1,000 words.
    [​IMG]
     

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