Showing chickens?

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the Standard o' started by CrazyChick7447, Dec 31, 2016.

  1. CrazyChick7447

    CrazyChick7447 Just Hatched

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    Hi guys. I'm not exactly new to the chicken world, I've grown up with them, but I am new to showing fowl. Could anybody with experience answer some of my questions, and off tips? Thanks!
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I've been showing chickens for five years, so I can try to answer some of your questions. [​IMG]
     
  3. CrazyChick7447

    CrazyChick7447 Just Hatched

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    Ok. So I have a pair of blue Cochin. My rooster has a patch of lighter feathers at the base of his neck. Will I have points taken off for that? [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  4. CrazyChick7447

    CrazyChick7447 Just Hatched

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    [​IMG]
     
  5. Fred's Hens

    Fred's Hens Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

    The point system, as it was known in the past, is not used anymore. Yes, the cuts are still there and it is a way of discounting one bird as opposed to another.

    Judging today is done by comparison. The judge working a large field, such as at the Ohio National, may have 100 birds of your breed to sort through. The judge often walks the field, maybe poking a few birds with his judge's stick. He's making mental notes of his top half dozen likely picks.

    Then, the judge will go ahead and work the birds, taking every last one of them out of the cage and examine them completely. Some birds are so "off" from their standard that the judge spends little to no time. Out and right back in. If they are of hatchery stock or far off, I've seen judges write Type on the coop card and move on, not even examining the bird. Other times, a line in marked on the coop card with a sharpie and the judge continues. If the judge finds a bird he/she likes, he may make a line with a check or some other mark. That means "I'll be back to look at you later". When the judge is finished with his judging of all the Cochins, with the help of the clerk who follows the judge making notes, the judge will return to his previous "liked birds". Thus, of all the 100 Cochins, he must pick his Best of Breed. He'll also assign the Reserve of Breed. Then the placing, if he thinks there are some worthy birds, he'll place the cocks. #1, #2, #3, and so on for the hens, the pullets and the cockerels. He will only place a # on a coop card of worthy birds. Of course, each variety gets it's Best and Reserve of Variety, but these are not considered anything to brag about too much. BB? That is a good bird and is eligible for consideration for the next level up of award. In this case, Champion Asiatic. Then, Champ.Large Fowl and then Show Champion. Each level higher up is intense and only the very, very best birds advance. Remember, they may have been 8000 birds in show.

    Best of Breed is a solid win. Heck, any placing # on your coop card is GREAT, if the field is large.

    (BTW, there is no "rooster" category). The males are either cockerels or cocks.

    So, a long way to explain, but the reality is this. Even if your Blue Cochin was otherwise a nice bird, with proper legs, comb, head, breast, tail, size, breed shape, and all the rest? If somewhere on Cochin Row there was a cockerel who's coloration was "even", as we say, your bird with uneven coloration might be viewed as the inferior bird.

    So, the answer to your question is this. 1. Buy the Standard. Memorize the standard's section for your breed/variety. 2. Conditioning always wins with the judges. A poorly conditioned bird has virtually no chance for serious consideration. 3. Work hard at making your Cochins as perfect as you can. The striving for perfection is never achieved, as it remains a life's work and goal. That's what keeps us going as breeders. The perfect bird has yet to be bred and never will. But to do well at a show? You've got to be closer to it than everyone else up and down the row around you.

    Good luck and enjoy this hobby. It's a lot of fun and you meet really great people.

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    Last edited: Dec 31, 2016
  6. CrazyChick7447

    CrazyChick7447 Just Hatched

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    Thank you very much that was extremely helpful.
     

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