Shriveled legs and feet, followed by death, what is it???

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by Cowgirl71, Jul 4, 2010.

  1. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've hatched a lot of chicks and keets this year, and in nearly every batch I've lost one or two chicks/keets to this. Their legs and feet get all dry and shriveled up looking, they become dozy, and then die within a few days. I've never had one survive this. I thought it was maybe them not finding the water (even though I dip everyone's beaks)... It's affected them at 1-10 days of age. What is it???
     
  2. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Anyone???

    BTW, I THOUGHT that it was them not finding the water, but then I had a 10-day-old keet get it, and die a couple days later. I don't think it would take that long to show symptoms. Before that it was only 1-3 day olds that got it...
     
  3. Tiramisu

    Tiramisu Got Mutts

    May 3, 2008
    Milan PA
    Something wrong with incubatoin?? Idk [​IMG] have no idea....hope someone can help. Maybe you should try to have this moved to Emergencies/Diseases / Injuries and Cures

    Edited because that sentence made no sense*
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2010
  4. oldchickenlady

    oldchickenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 9, 2010
    Cabot, AR
    I'm sorry, I am too new at raising chickens to be able to help. I am sorry though...[​IMG]
     
  5. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

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    Fowl Chlorea Has your Exact Same symptoms, sadly it occurs in chickens six weeks and older. Fowl Chlorea is the only disease i can find with swollen foot pads.

    But pollurum infects alot of chicks, Now is it the footpads or the legs effected specifically the area?
    Just in case it is pollurum
    Pullorum

    Synonyms: bacillary white diarrhea, BWD

    Species affected: Chickens and turkeys are most susceptible, although other species of birds can become infected. Pullorum has never been a problem in commercially grown game birds such as pheasant, chukar partridge and quail. Infection in mammals is rare.

    Clinical signs: Death of infected chicks or poults begins at 5-7 days of age and peaks in another 4-5 days. Clinical signs including huddling, droopiness, diarrhea, weakness, pasted vent, gasping, and chalk-white feces, sometimes stained with green bile. Affected birds are unthrifty and stunted because they do not eat (see Table 3 ). Survivors become asymptomatic carriers with localized infection in the ovary.

    Transmission: Pullorum is spread primarily through the egg, from hen to chick. It can spread further by contaminated incubators, hatchers, chick boxes, houses, equipment, poultry by-product feedstuffs and carrier birds.

    Treatment: Treatment is for flock salvage only. Several sulfonamides, antibiotics, and antibacterials are effective in reducing mortality, but none eradicates the disease from the flock. Pullorum eradication is required by law . Eradication requires destroying the entire flock.

    Prevention: Pullorum outbreaks are handled, on an eradication basis, by state/federal regulatory agencies. As part of the National Poultry Improvement Program, breeder replacement flocks are tested before onset of production to assure pullorum-free status. This mandatory law includes chickens, turkeys, show birds, waterfowl, game birds, and guinea fowl. In Florida, a negative pullorum test or certification that the bird originated from a pullorum-free flock is required for admission for exhibit at shows and fairs. Such requirements have been beneficial in locating pullorum-infected flocks of hobby chickens.
     
  6. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

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    This Might Be a long shot, but i did a search on BYC And alot of people said gout can cause this. When i look up symptoms swollen feet isnt there, but maybe im missing something other Bycers already know. Its worth a shot.

    Heres a link on gout http://www.lorikeets.com/gout.htm
     
  7. Cowgirl71

    Cowgirl71 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Missouri Ozarks
    Their feet are NOT swollen, they're dry and shriveling looking. A REGULAR chick, in comparison, has nice plump legs and feet. Versus my sick chick's feet and legs are basicly bone covered in paper-thin skin that looks so dry and tight that you can easily see the blood veins. After laying around a couple days, they die, no matter what TLC I give them. And they do look normal when they hatch, it seems that they get "it" later...

    Thanks anyway, usschicago1, I really appreciate it. [​IMG] If I don't get an answer by tomorrow evening, I'll go ahead and see if I can move this thread to Emergencies/Diseases/Injuries and Cures, Tiramisu. [​IMG]
     
  8. usschicago1

    usschicago1 Suburban Cochins

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    Quote:Im determined to find out whats wrong, ill go searching again later when im more awake [​IMG]
     
  9. greenfamilyfarms

    greenfamilyfarms Big Pippin'

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    Could they have had cocci? That could case them to get dehydrated and then die.
     
  10. AHappychick

    AHappychick Wanna-be Farmer

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    that is very strange, I wonder if it is a genetic thing going on, are the keets all related? if no one answers and you cant find anything I would ask Dr. Brown on Firststatevetsupply.com if anyone knows he will. Good Luck!
     

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