shy pullets?

Discussion in 'Chicken Behaviors and Egglaying' started by lexapurple, Feb 26, 2008.

  1. lexapurple

    lexapurple Out Of The Brooder

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    I have 4 three month old pullets in the same pen with full grown pullets. There is two large plastic dog kennels in the pen with them so they have plenty of room to hide, and it is what they do all day long! While full grown chickens walk around, three months olds pile up in one of the kennels and don't come out. Sometimes one of the adults will go in there and peck on them to make them move. Only time I seen little ones come out is in the morning and in the evening when adults are starting to roost. Is it normal for young birgs to act this way?
    if it matters I did not raise those birds and don't know anything about their past.
    Aleksandra
     
  2. MissPrissy

    MissPrissy Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    At three months of age - 12 weeks or so they are not big enough to protect themselves from a full on hen attack. I never try to integrate chickens into the main flock until they are at least 16 weeks and close to the same size as a fully grown hen.

    They probably know they don't stand a chance against the older hens and prefer to hide.
     
  3. Yogiman

    Yogiman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    They are not shy. They are just being bullied which is not good for them.
     
  4. lexapurple

    lexapurple Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you.
    12 weeks or so they are not big enough to protect themselves from a full on hen attack. I never try to integrate chickens into the main flock until they are at least 16 weeks and close to the same size as a fully grown hen.

    I am not sure how old they are exactly, but they just slightly smaller than adults. First day I got them they were separated from others where they could not see each other. They were in the corner all day and came out in the evening. Thant I put them in their own enclosure consisting of wire crate and plastic kennel pushed together in the large run with the adults. They were doing the same thing. I let them out and watched interact with adults, the only time they got pecked on was then they piled up in the corner and one of the adults wanted to see what it was about and tried to get in between little ones.When they didn't move she pecked on them. They roost together at night and in the morning they scratch around the run and don't mind the adults it is during theday then they avoid comming out of the kennel.
    Do you think I should separate them and try to reentroduce them later?​
     
  5. polish15

    polish15 Out Of The Brooder

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    If they are smaller then the adults then it is best to just seperate them until the are the same size. They are most likely afraid of the older hens. Try to get them running around and see if they get picked on. If they do then seperate them till they are plenty big.
     
  6. polish15

    polish15 Out Of The Brooder

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    Do they roost with the older hens?
     
  7. lexapurple

    lexapurple Out Of The Brooder

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    Do they roost with the older hens?

    Yes they do roost with adults. When they walk around they stay out of adults way but adults do not go after them.​
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2008
  8. polish15

    polish15 Out Of The Brooder

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    odd? you could try taking them away anyway. guess there's no chance they are sick?
     
  9. Yogiman

    Yogiman Chillin' With My Peeps

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    When I am introducing new chicks to a flock I put them into an area adjacent to the flock yet separated by wire. This allows them time ( at least 1 week) to become accustomed to each other but sepaeated. Of course when they are finnally brought together they will immediately establish a pecking order but that is normally short lived. Mother nature rules in every case.
     

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