Sick 10 week olds any advice?

Discussion in 'Turkeys' started by motherhen2013, Aug 26, 2014.

  1. motherhen2013

    motherhen2013 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 13, 2014
    Fifty six arkansas
    Any advice is so appreciated. So we just built a 8x16' outside chain link pen for our turkeys and put them in it Wednesday. They've done wonderful and they're shaded btw by sheet iron on the roof. But yesterday noticed one wasn't feelin to well and got really weak as the day went on. I wet down the pen(careful not to wet them)(it was very hot and my dad thinks that it might be dust pneumonia) I got some electrolytes and put in their water and also some sulfamethazene an antibiotic I guess?... I gave the really sick one some baby rice cereal (it's craw was empty and it was very light.) I added a little sugar for a little boost of energy and gave it some through an eye dropper. It felt a little better today but it still is weak and today there were more with the same symptoms. I haven't switched feed or anything sudden like that and I've kept them fresh water. The nights are comfortably warm so I don't think it's the weather unless they're getting too hot during the day. I would really appreciate any advice. They are so weak and I hate seeing them like this.
     
  2. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    What variety of turkey and what are you feeding them (percentage protein)?
     
  3. motherhen2013

    motherhen2013 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 13, 2014
    Fifty six arkansas
    They're wild turkeys from Arkansas and I think the protein is in the mid twenties I can't remember for sure @ivan3
     
  4. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Do the droppings appear normal? What are you using as flooring/bedding (why suspect it is `dust pneumonia'?), how hot does it get in their pen when day is hottest? How many do you have in that sized pen?

    Anything else that you can think of that would be helpful?
     
  5. motherhen2013

    motherhen2013 Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 13, 2014
    Fifty six arkansas
    @ivan3 I only got to see one of the sick ones droppings one day. When he went it was thin/watery and kind of whitish color but had small solid pieces in it. they are on grass and their pen probably got in the upper 90s whenever they were doing this. I have 10 turkeys in this 8x16 cage and two roosts for them to get on. It was really dry here when they were sick (hence the dust pneumonia) we started wetting the sheet iron on top of their pen and part of the grass in the pen(left them enough so they could stay in dry grass if they wanted) before we went to work everyday. With the electrolytes and the antibiotics in their water for q couple days they started showing improvements almost immediately. They are completely better now and have all strength back. I'm not sure what caused it unless it could be the heat. They are wild turkeys as I mentioned and I plan on releasing them as soon as they are of age because they are very afraid of dogs and humans and I'm trying to keep things fairly natural around them to get them accustomed to the adjustment of when I release them in the spring. Any other future advise is appreciated.
     
  6. ivan3

    ivan3 spurredon Premium Member

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    Good to hear. Next time it gets really hot, a cheap, adjustable speed, box fan will move the air around (we keep two pointed into run and the turks line up in front of them). They also like to cool off by standing in water: [​IMG] Do your turkeys have access to grit? A couple of handfuls of small gravels will be picked through until they find the proper size. Insofar as releasing them. This is tough to accomplish successfully. The ONLY difference between a Wild Eastern & a Domestic Eastern is that the Wild poult imprinted on the hen and takes its cues from her on what to eat/avoid. Prolonged habituation to human provided habitation/food source decreases chances of survival in the wild substantially. If these turks, as poults, imprinted on humans shortly after hatch (the human is the hen for all intents and purposes), then the chances of successful release into the wild drops even further. A couple of references that might come in handy: http://www.livestockconservancy.org/index.php/resources/internal /turkey-manual (whole thing can be downloaded/read online - lots of info (right down to grit size by age). A fellow who actually had a brood of Osceola's (eggs) delivered to his door and his experience raising/releasing (maybe some survived): http://www.pbs.org/wnet/nature/episodes/my-life-as-a-turkey/full-episode/7378/ Good luck and thanks for updating!
     

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