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Sick bantam! Help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by sbrooks88, Jul 22, 2013.

  1. sbrooks88

    sbrooks88 Chirping

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    Jul 11, 2013
    North Carolina
    Ill try to make this short. I have mixed flock of 30 birds. DH "thought" I'd like to have some bantams....wrong.... So he decides to sell 4 of my beautiful plymouths that had just started laying to buy 3 bantams. :-/ makes me mad to think about it. These 3 bantams came from a guy who DIDNT take care of them.2 seem fine but I still have them confined together. And 1 I have confined totally isolated from any other birds because he is sick. I cannot figure out what is wrong. He will not eat or drink. I shoved bamama bits in his mouth yesterday which he ate and seemed to enjoy but he will not take anything else! He just sits there and then goes to walk away and staggers and stumbles like a drunk. His poo is really runny and white and smells bad enough to gag a maggot! I've tried feeding with a dropper but he spits it out. Please help.
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Free Ranging Premium Member 7 Years

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    You didn't say what age the bantams are, but they might have coryza a respiratory disease that usually causes a foul odor about the head, sometimes facial swelling, eye drainage, rattly breathing, or nasal drainage. Mycoplasma is another respiratory disease with similar symptoms minus the foul odor. Coccidiosis, an infection of the intestines, can cause foul smelling diarrhea, sometimes, but not always, bloody stools. It is treated with Corid (amprollium.) The respiratory diseases can be treated with Tylan, Duramycin 10, or Denagard, but it helps to know which one you are dealing with. They will probably spread this to your flock since respiratory diseases can become chronic and survivors become carriers. Many people choose to cull these birds. I honestly would try to return them because it will cost some money to treat them.
     
  3. sbrooks88

    sbrooks88 Chirping

    420
    12
    81
    Jul 11, 2013
    North Carolina
    I have kept them completely seperate from the rest of my flock. And it doesn't resemble coccidia I've had an outbreak once before in a separate flock. And I've dealt with respiratory infections also. No clicking breathing no labored breathing. He just doesn't act right. I am going to guess they are about a year old. Because we know they guy and remember when he got them as chicks. This one though is pitiful. I've just made some mashed up fresh corn and added duramycin to it. He ate only a little before laying back down. And his poo stinks not him. Smells like the garbage dump and rotten fruit. Yuck! I actually have him inside my house And always care for the healthy ones outside before this one to reduce risk of spreading. I also have been bleaching my shoes a vet tech told me a few years ago that lots of chicken infections can be carried by our feet from walking in their poo outside. I clean his container 2 times a day and replace food and water 4 times a day. Should I just cull this one? I'm so unsure what to do
     

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