Sick Bantam- not eating- but is clearly hungry.

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by barbsgyp, Dec 21, 2011.

  1. barbsgyp

    barbsgyp New Egg

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    Hi Everyone,

    I hope you can guide me into which direction(s) to take on this...

    I have a four year old Wyandotte X Bantam hen and she's clearly not herself.

    She usually gobbles down corn from my hand but yesterday morning (Dec 20) she started to pick at her treats, able to eat some corn, but it was a half hearted attempt to eat. Today this has increased to not eating anything, but it is clear to me that she is interested in eating since she tries to peck at the corn, but can't seem to pick it up. Her pecks are weak, her beak is open slightly, and the beak will not open to pick up food, and she doesn't have it closed (like the other birds.) There doesn't appear to be any breathing problems. Crop seems normal, but to be honest I've never felt a birds crop before for symptoms, (after searching this site for possible answers and learned a few more things)

    I lost an older hen about two weeks ago but this bird just stopped eating, and was not exhibiting the same symptoms as this bantam. Everyone else in the coop is acting normal.
    I'm not sure if she's eating the layer ration, or drinking much.

    I don't know what her poop is like, she's not pooped when I've been out there, and I generally 'chicken watch' so I may have just missed the pooping moment. I may put her in isulation to monitor her better.

    She is currently living in a large coop with about 16 birds. The water is cleaned and changed regularly, clean bedding and dry food.
    Oyster shells and grit provided since they are shut in for the winter now. Coop is cleaned regularly (spring/fall/winter) and not damp.

    any thoughts? I'd really like to try and save her. I'm willing to treat her myself, since I doubt any vet would know where to start.

    Barb

    thanks in advance,
     
  2. stoopid

    stoopid Chicken Fairy Godmother

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    The first thing I would do is give her anything that she can't refuse.
    Mealworms, canned or frozen corn kernels, anything they go crazy for.
    See what happens...
     
  3. barbsgyp

    barbsgyp New Egg

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    Apr 26, 2009
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    Well, this is what brought my attention to her yesterday, not only would she pick at the corn, she wouldn't eat the cooked meat I was handing out... she usually comes flying at you for this stuff. (My daughter taught her to land on your shoulder)

    so..... she's feeling that crappy.

    thanks,
    Barb
     
  4. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Do you think there's a possiblity there's something wrong in her mouth or throat??
     
  5. barbsgyp

    barbsgyp New Egg

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    Apr 26, 2009
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    I looked into her little mouth/throat, but I don't believe there is anything there. She's really acting like a sick bird, so while she is hungry, she becoming less and less interested in eating.

    Barb
     
  6. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Chickens with fungal infections in their digestive systems can get feeling sickly & week & like not eating, and get skinnier until they eventually die. My hens that got these pecked some at food without eating at times.
    I don't AT ALL know if that might be your bird's problem. You could examine the possibility on the Fungal Infections page on my site if you think it could be.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
  7. ChickDaze

    ChickDaze Out Of The Brooder

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    Maybe she would go for layer and water mix? It might be easier to eat if it is softer.
     
  8. elmo

    elmo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The first thing I always do when a notice something odd about a bird is to isolate her. That way I can tell what she's eating and what her droppings look like. I can also provide a little extra warmth, something that is often helpful if a bird is feeling poorly. Sometimes that's all a bird needs to perk back up: some warmth, good food and a respite from the stress of flock dynamics. Sometimes a bird is being bullied and fears coming forward for treats; isolation will establish whether this is what's going on, too.

    Isolating a bird also provides an additional benefit: if the bird has something that is contagious, isolation helps to contain the spread somewhat, especially if you can catch it early.

    I also weigh and record the weights of the birds in our flock. I've noticed that weight fluctuates quite a bit depending on where the individual is in her egg laying cycle. But if a bird's weight is down noticeably more than the weight of her usual egg, then that might be an early sign of illness.

    Of course, the weight of broody hens goes down, as does the weight of molting chickens.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2011
  9. barbsgyp

    barbsgyp New Egg

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    She is now isolated.

    I saw her poop today and it is a bit runny, some lumps in it, and frothy. Half and half, doesn't smell off (if you know what I mean)

    I put her in her own crate, with food and water. I've added a few drops of vinager to the water, and hope for some better results tomorrow.

    if it is a fungal infection what antibiotics can I use for her?

    Barb
     
  10. SpeckledHills

    SpeckledHills Chillin' With My Peeps

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    In the "Other possible treatments" list on the Fungal Infections page, there is a link to the Poultry Medicines Chart. You can look thru it for meds that are listed for one or more of the following: Mycotoxicosis, Thrush, Aspergillosis, candidiasis or other internal fungal conditions.
     

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