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Sick Chick with Bloody Poops

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ghost_rider, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. ghost_rider

    ghost_rider Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 25, 2010
    I am in the process of raising a new flock of RIR's. We have 11 baby chicks that are all about 6 weeks old today. They have been on the Purena Start & Grow feed and all have been very well thus far. We do have an older hen who is about 10 months old, she is a survivor from a small flock that was actually stolen from our place, she is a free ranger and is only in the coop at night. The chicks have been introduced into the coop and everyone seems to be living happy. They've been in the coop for the last couple weeks.

    This morning when I went out to turn their light on I noticed that one of the chick has bloody poops. I am pretty familiar with the appearance of chick poo and this doesn't look good.

    Now that the chicks are up and moving around I believe I have determined the sick chick, she kind of just stands there as if she doesn't feel very well. Last time I checked she was perched up on their little, lower roost, while the others are all moving around eating!

    I've post two photos that I took this morning of the bloody poo. Any suggestions here would be greatly appreciated, I thought that perhaps I should give some probiotics but wasn't sure. Could this be a result of them pecking at cardboard within the coop, before letting them loose in the coop they were boxed into one corner so that they could get used to it first.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  2. dawg53

    dawg53 Humble

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    Jacksonville, Florida
    Here's the poop pics. http://www.chat.allotment.org.uk/index.php?topic=17568.0
    You
    can determine in the pics if it's coccidia or intestinal lining that was shed, which is normal. However, from your description it sounds like coccidia. Treatment would be either corid or sulmet. Coccidia can spead quickly and wipe out the others.
     
  3. ghost_rider

    ghost_rider Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 25, 2010
    I've seen the poop page and thought the same but wanted some additional input.

    I thought that the medicated start and grow helped against this?? If the feed is not doing its job I am sure I can buy something much cheaper.

    Should I quarantine or just give medication? I certainly don't want this to spread to the others. [​IMG]
     
  4. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    Western N.C.
    I didn't write this but came across it and thought it might help, hope they get well.


    So many people have issues and ask questions about coccidiosis that I thought I would post this milk flush treatment that I cam across. This is a treatment that a college agricultural dept. came up with. You can break it down into a smaller portion but this is as it was listed.

    4 pounds of dried milk
    2 pounds of corn meal
    2 pounds of oatmeal
    1 pound of bran

    Feed this for 3-5 days with no other feed except some greens. The large amount of milk makes the chicks thirsty, causing them to drink. The milk sugar will turn to acid in the stomach and the extra added water will flush out the system.

    Maybe this will help some of you that has a hard time finding the corid/amprol in your area.
    Lavender Orpington Project, Standard Buff Laced Polish, Black and Lavender bantam cochins.
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    #2 05/22/2009 5:19 pm
    cmom
    Hilltop Farm

    From: Florida
    Registered: 11/18/2007
    Posts: 6727
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    Re: Milk flush for coccidiosis
    From: http://attra.ncat.org/attra-pub/PDF/coccidiosis.pdf

    Natural
    Treatments
    Keeping birds in general good health is
    always important. Some small producers
    provide raw milk, yogurt, apple cider
    vinegar, or probiotics to birds, believing
    that beneficial microbes will prevent or
    treat coccidiosis. Actually, coccidia do not
    compete with bacteria in the gut; therefore,
    beneficial bacteria and other microbes
    will not eliminate coccidial development.
    However, anything that improves the overall
    health of the gut and the bird can help
    reduce the impact of coccidiosis. Also, a
    population of beneficial bacteria is always
    better than pathogenic bacteria, since coccidia
    weaken the gut wall, and bacteria may
    pass through. In short, feeding dairy products
    or probiotics will not stop the coccidia
    through “competitive exclusion” but does
    provide nutrients or beneficial bacteria that
    are useful in any situation.
    Producers sometimes give diatomaceous
    earth (DE) to the birds in the belief that the
    sharp edges of the fossilized diatoms will
    damage the parasites and reduce coccidiosis;
    however, there is no scientific data to
    support its use.

    Drugs
    Drugs are used for two different purposes:
    To prevent illness
    To treat illness
    Although a producer may depend on management
    for coccidiosis control, a drug such
    as amprolium is useful for rescue treatment
    in the case of an outbreak. There is no
    need to destroy infected birds; they can be
    treated. In large houses, it is necessary to
    routinely use drugs or vaccines because of
    the high density of birds.
    Types of Drugs
    Sulfa drugs: An exciting discovery
    in the 1930s was that sulfa drugs
    would prevent coccidiosis—the first
    drugs shown to do so. Sulfa drugs
    also have some antibacterial action.
    However, a relatively large amount
    of sulfa was needed (10-20 percent
    of the diet) and could be tolerated
    by the bird for only a short time,
    since it caused rickets. (Reid, 1990)
    Sulfa drugs had to be used intermittently
    (e.g., three days on and three
    days off). Nowadays, comparatively
    small amounts of sulfamonaides,
    such as sulfaquinoxaline, are
    used. They work only against
    Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria
    maxima, not against Eimeria
    tenella. Sulfamonaides are used to
    treat coccidiosis.
    Amprolium: Amprolium is an anticoccidial
    drug. It has also been
    used for many years and needs no
    withdrawal time to guard against
    residue in the meat. It is given in
    the drinking water and interferes
    with metabolism of the vitamin thiamin
    (vitamin B1) in coccidia. Amprolium
    treats both intestinal and
    cecal coccidia.
    Last edited by cmom (05/22/2009 5:21 pm)
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    #3 05/31/2009 12:26 am
    froggie71
    Chicken Obsessed

    From: Shamong, NJ
    Registered: 04/18/2009
    Posts: 2460
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    Re: Milk flush for coccidiosis
    Featherfoot2 wrote:

    So many people have issues and ask questions about coccidiosis that I thought I would post this milk flush treatment that I cam across. This is a treatment that a college agricultural dept. came up with. You can break it down into a smaller portion but this is as it was listed.

    4 pounds of dried milk
    2 pounds of corn meal
    2 pounds of oatmeal
    1 pound of bran

    Feed this for 3-5 days with no other feed except some greens. The large amount of milk makes the chicks thirsty, causing them to drink. The milk sugar will turn to acid in the stomach and the extra added water will flush out the system.

    Maybe this will help some of you that has a hard time finding the corid/amprol in your area.
    A friend just sent me an SOS re: her sick hen and not being able to find corid/amprol. I'm sending her this info, thanks!
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    #4 05/31/2009 2:33 am
    cochinbantam-lover
    Chicken Obsessed

    From: Wisconsin
    Registered: 05/01/2009
    Posts: 1201
    E-mail PM
    Re: Milk flush for coccidiosis
    Thankyou so much for this important information, I'm hoping that I won't ever need it but it's nice to have handy! It looks like you have already helped someone with this!
    crazi about critders!
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    #5 06/28/2009 5:02 pm
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2011
  5. ghost_rider

    ghost_rider Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 25, 2010
    Sulmet has been given through their drinking water. It ooks like the little chick might be felling a bit better, up and moving around and eating!

    I will administer the Sulmet as directed in addition to probiotics. This was the first day I noticed the bloody poo so hopeful things will work their way out so to speak!

    Thanks [​IMG]
     

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