Sick Chicken---Bubbling eye, and swelling of lower eye lid

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Valleygirl2119, May 23, 2007.

  1. Valleygirl2119

    Valleygirl2119 Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 24, 2007
    Hi, I has a question in diagnosing what is wrong with my cochin hen. She has a weird bubbling in one eye and her lower eyelid has begin to swell. Let me know if you have any suggestions. Thank you soooo much!

    Here is a pic of her normal eye.....

    [​IMG]



    Here is a pic of her sick eye......showing the swelling

    [​IMG]




    Here is a pic of her sick eye....showing bubbles in the corner

    [​IMG]





    Pic showing the difference in both eyes.....

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    THank you so much, for any help that you give me!

    -Ashley
     
  2. missusduray

    missusduray Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 20, 2007
    Northern Minnesota
    Could it be a sinus infection? I would maybe call your vet.
    Hope that it gets better, I wish I had some advice for you.
    Kristyne
     
  3. NOSPRINGCHIC

    NOSPRINGCHIC Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 18, 2007
    DALLAS, TX
    I bought some chicks from a guy (i thought was a friend) about a week ago. They started showing the same symptoms a few days ago. I asked him about it and he kinda blew it off like a cold or something and told me to put Terramycin in their water.
    But that's not enough foe me , so I called an old expert who told me to immediately segregate all the chicks, this is an airborne illness. He also said the terramycin will help but if you wanna knock this out go for Tylan 50. 1/10cc for chicks, 1/4cc for adult birds.
    I have so far only treated with terramycin because I just realized there was a problem last night. So I can't tell you what kind of results it will have. My DH went to a feed store that had the Tylan 50 today. So I'll be treating with that soon. Also, My friend(the real friend) said I should treat the entire flock. He did not know the exact name or origin of this disease, he had just been through it before.
    This has really sent me over the edge! The guy I bought these chicks from promised me they were in good health, he knew I would be integrating them into my large flock, and knew I was trying to raise totally organic.
    By the way You cannot eat the eggs while the birds are being treated and I haven't got an answer on how long you have to wait after treatment yet....but I am on the phone with McMurry trying to get that answered.
    PLEASE be very careful buying chicks from "buddies" they really could do damage to your flock and completely ruin your week.
    Whew....I wrote alot ...felt good to get it out, Thanks for listening.
    Also, If you learn the exact name of this disease PLEASE let me know.
    According to some of the stuff I have read these symptoms fit Cronic Respiratory Disease or Mycoplasma Gallisepticum.
    I would love to find out what this stuff is and know for sure if and how many birds I need to cull.
     
  4. hencam

    hencam Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 5, 2007
    Massachusetts
    Hi-

    My chickens have exactly the same thing. I took one of them to the vet today and it was diagnosed as avian conjunctivitis caused by a bacterium - mycoplasm gallisepticum. It spreads by contact, not via the air, so isolate your sick chicken. Use anticeptic lotion on your hands. Don't compost your waste - throw it out!

    You'll need to get an anitibiotic eye ointment from your vet and probably a systemic one (to put in the water or as tablets) as well.

    This same disease is becoming epidemic in wild house finches in the Northeast. I don't know where my hens got it. Possibly wild birds, or possibly a new hen which I introduced recently - but I had her in isolation first, and she is still healthy. Healthy looking hens can be carriers and their owners might not know it.

    Check my Web site, http://www.hencam.com (go to the blog) for more info and links.

    Terry
     
  5. Dom'sHEns

    Dom'sHEns Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 2, 2007
    New Jersey
    Terry!
    Nice to see that your hear! Im glad that you found a soultion for your hens! I follow your blog and check out your cam religiously! I have you cookbook on the way.
    Good Luck with the Girls and keep us updated!
    Stay well, Dom
     
  6. NOSPRINGCHIC

    NOSPRINGCHIC Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 18, 2007
    DALLAS, TX
    Terry,
    Thanks for the info...I have cured the ill chicks(Tylan 50), but I am so glad to know what they had. Will they carry this disease always? (if I introduce new healthy chicks to the flock 4 weeks from now will they also catch the eye bubble?)
    I'm going to check out your website now....BBL to see if you have replied...
    Thanks so much,
    Carla
     
  7. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/PS031
    Eye
    Disorders of Poultry 1
    J.P. Jacob, G.D. Butcher and F.B. Mather2
    Eye disorders are not generally prevalent in poultry on a flock basis. However, as birds rely heavily on their sense of sight to carry on their daily activities, an increased incidence of eye problems can result in decreased flock performance. A visually impaired bird is at a major disadvantage in competing for food, water, and social position in a population of birds.

    Ammonia Toxicity
    The most common eye irritant in intensive animal production systems is ammonia gas (NH 3 ). Ammonia gas is extremely irritating to the membranes that line the eyelids, eyes, sinuses and trachea. Conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva (membranes that line the eyelids) and the exposed sclera (white part of the eye). Affected birds have reddened, swollen eyelids, and are sensitive to and avoid light. If high ammonia levels persist, the cornea, the outermost part of the front of the eyeball, becomes ulcerated and blindness may occur.
    Ammonia gas is a bacterial breakdown product produced when uric acid from poultry manure combines with water forming a suitable environment for bacterial growth. Bacterial growth, and the resulting NH 3 production, is also dependent upon litter or manure pH and temperature.

    In intensive production systems, high levels of ammonia gas buildup are associated with inadequate ventilation. Ammonia is not typically a problem for birds raised in extensive or semi-extensive systems.


    Marek's Disease
    Marek's disease is a viral disease of chickens resulting in a type of cancer. Tumors developing in nerves cause lameness and paralysis. Tumors can also occur in the iris (segmented membrane behind the cornea perforated by the pupil) and cause irregular shaped pupils and blindness.
    Chicks can be vaccinated at the hatchery. While the vaccination is effective in preventing formation of tumors, it does not prevent infection by the virus. Recent studies have shown that conventional Marek's disease vaccines may not prevent formation of tumors in the eye.

    Avian Pox
    Avian pox is a viral disease that affects many types of birds. Fowl pox primarily affects chickens and turkeys. Pigeon pox affects pigeons, chickens, turkeys, ducks, and geese. Canary pox infects canaries, chickens, sparrows, and probably other species.
    Pox is characterized by raised, blister-like lesions that develop on unfeathered areas (head, legs, vent, etc.) of the bird. If the lesions are around the eyes, then swelling may occur with impairment of eyesight and possibly blindness in severe cases. Ordinarily, the eyeball itself remains unaffected and, once lesions are resolved, eyesight should return to normal.

    Bacterial Infections
    A number of bacterial infections can lead to damage of the eye. Salmonella bacteria, particularly Salmonella typhimurium and Salmonella arizona , are known to cause severe purulent conjunctivitis and ophthalmitis (inflammation of the eyeball and conjunctiva with pus) and blindness. Often young birds acquire the infections from the hen or through navel or yolk sac infections.

    Fungal Infections
    Molds readily grow on a number of different materials, including poultry feed and litter. A common mold is Aspergillus . Birds can be exposed to Aspergillus or other fungi in the hatchery, or more commonly in poorly dried litter. While Aspergillus is usually considered a respiratory tract pathogen, it can also invade the brain and eye. Yellow plaques develop and can be found under the eyelid. The eye becomes inflamed and severe damage can occur.

    Respiratory Infections
    A number of respiratory diseases can cause conjunctivitis, including Newcastle disease, laryngotracheitis, infectious bronchitis, chlamydia, and mycoplasma. These infections do not damage the eye itself, but cause the bird discomfort, leading to rubbing and scratching of the eyelids. Permanent eye injury with these conditions is rare. However, sinusitis can develop, causing swelling of the sinus under the eyelid and adding to bird discomfort.

    Nervous System Disorders
    Avian encephalomyelitis virus normally causes disease in chickens 1-6 weeks of age. The virus primarily affects the nervous system. Affected chicks show a dull expression of the eyes, followed by progressive incoordination, sitting on hocks, tremors of the head and neck, and finally paralysis or prostration. In adult birds previously infected as chicks, the virus can cause cataracts and general eye enlargement. The lens of the eye becomes fragmented and can no longer function properly to focus images.

    Nutrional Deficiencies
    Certain vitamin deficiencies, such as vitamin A and vitamin E, can result in damage to the eye. Vitamin A is necessary for the production of visual pigment of the retina and for maintenance of the lining of the tear ducts. Vitamin E is necessary for maintenance of the lens protein in the developing embryo. Vitamin E is passed from the breeder hen to the egg. If the breeder is receiving inadequate vitamin E in the diet, the embryo will suffer from a vitamin E deficiency and possible blindness. Vitamin deficiencies are rare when commercial poultry feeds are used.

    Developmental Disorders
    Congenital abnormalities in the formation and placement of the eye and eye socket occur, but the incidence is low. Abnormalities seen include one or both eyes missing, eyes reduced in size or placed forward on the head. These abnormalities may be hereditary or may be due to improper pre-incubation or incubation conditions. Affected chicks are usually culled at the hatchery.

    Cataracts
    A high incidence of cataracts can occur in flocks with vitamin E deficiency, avian encephalomyelitis infection, or continuous exposure to some types of artificial lighting.

    Trauma
    Injury to the eye and surrounding structures can occur in the hatchery, during transportation to the farm, or on the farm by poorly maintained equipment. Bright, shiny eyes can be an attractive target for picking by flock mates. Most chicks, however, are very adept at protecting their heads so that eye injury due to picking is rarely a problem.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Footnotes
    1. This document is PS37, one of a series of the Animal Science Department, Florida Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida. Original publication date April 1998. Reviewed June 2003. Visit the EDIS Web Site at http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu.
    2. J. P. Jacob, poultry extension coordinator, G.D. Butcher, extension poultry veterinarian, and F.B. Mather, poultry extension specialist, Cooperative Extension Service, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, 32611.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2007
    1 person likes this.
  8. hencam

    hencam Out Of The Brooder

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    Jun 5, 2007
    Massachusetts
    Hi Carla-

    Is Tylan 50 an antibiotic you put in the water? How long did it take to work? How long until your hens looked normal (or do they have some remaining swelling?)

    My vet was out of the powder, so I am putting pills down my hens' throats!

    Vets believe that the hens will be carriers of the conjunctivitis for the rest of their lives. However, I haven't found any research to prove that. As I said, I've got a RIRed that I've had now for 30 days, and she has no sign of illness. She's also been in contact with a hen now in my other coop and that coop (so far) doesn't have an outbreak. I have no way of knowing if Prudence brought the ailment to my flock.

    There's no good info for backyard poultry keepers who don't want to cull the sick birds. I haven't found anything about how long it takes to cure, incubation period, or morbidity. So, I'm going to look further into what they've learned about the wild finches that have it.

    Anyway, I'm supposed to have a photo shoot with these hens this weekend. Looks like I have to cancel. I have backup birds, but they're not trained yet (I have the hens trained to pose next to a target stick. Check my blog!)

    Terry
     
  9. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    Jan 11, 2007
  10. NOSPRINGCHIC

    NOSPRINGCHIC Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 18, 2007
    DALLAS, TX
    Hey Terry,
    Tylan 50 is injected intramuscular. I used the small diabetic needles. I gave full size birds .25cc and chicks .10cc. I bought the smallest bottle possible @ the feed store(about $10) didn't even use 1/4 of the bottle to treat the whole flock. If I had known that this disease was passed through contact, I wouldn't have treated my large birds...they never showed any signs of illness. I treated on the 18th of May and there are absolutely no signs of it now, they all look totally normal. I saw huge improvement w/in two days and most every chick was fine in a week. The more severe cases hung around a little longer. I dosed only one time. Tylan 50 is also sold through McMurry, but it would be quicker to run to the feed store and probably the same price.
    On a side note, once I treated w/injection I did not give any other type of antibiotic, LOTS of fresh water, and their standard feed.
    BTW...your website is cool..I haven't got a chance to check out the blog yet.
    Let me know how things go,
    Carla
     

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