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Sick Chicken

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Fakeflowers, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. Fakeflowers

    Fakeflowers New Egg

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    Apr 6, 2016
    Hi. I have two eight year old hens.

    About two weeks ago, I noticed the buff orphington had a black scab on her nostril (raised up like a blister.) I did some research and it seemed to me like fowl pox.

    I watched her and eventually she began getting more disinterested in going out--even though we have grass and they usually love to go out of the fenced yard into the other part. I started putting Vet rx on her blister, and she hated it so much that she would run out and begin eating grass, so I was happy she was consuming food as I can't tell if she's consuming food and water. But I added electrolytes to the water available.

    I also noticed that the pox seemed to be wet inside her mouth--on the roof of her mouth. And her breathing became more labored.

    About two days ago she stopped wanting to come out at all (she also developed a growth under her eye, which I assume is fowl pox). And last night I noticed her acting strange. I should have assumed then that she was dehydrated, though I had also been offering her watermelon and she seemed to have eaten a little.

    Then this morning she was acting very strange so I realized that she may be dehydrated. I gave her some water this afternoon from a syringe, but didn't open her mouth--just kind of kept slowly squirting it in the side as she swallowed. I am not sure how much she drank.

    Then this evening she was listless, so I began squirting more water in her mouth and she fought with her head, but her body is pretty listless. I wrapped her in a blanket. I think she's taken about 30-40 ml and she's totally passed out asleep.

    I'm not sure what to do--she won't open either of her eyes anymore since yesterday, and I'm not sure if I should force feed her/force her to drink. She's a bit older for a hen, so I'm not sure if she will get over it. I was more hopeful until about three days ago.
     
  2. Fakeflowers

    Fakeflowers New Egg

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    Apr 6, 2016
    I feel dumb now, because I think I made two versions of the same thread, which hopefully say about the same thing. I didn't realize this one posted and thought perhaps it didn't go through because I hadn't verified my e-mail. I apologize for the duplicate. They hopefully both say about the same (though I am estimating the days/times and am a bit frazzled right now).
     
  3. Chicky Woos123

    Chicky Woos123 Out Of The Brooder

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    I hope that your hen gets better. You could try taking her to a vet maybe one who specializes in farm animals, and see what he/she has to say. I hope she gets better![​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  4. Fakeflowers

    Fakeflowers New Egg

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    Thanks! I almost took her a couple times, and have before, but was afraid the vet would say little about her condition, or that she should be put down. Plus, I didn't want to take that sixty mile round trip if I didn't have some really useful help. I'm a bit stretched for finances at the moment as well.

    She seemed to get better after I gave her water with the electrolyte mix/Vet rx. Though she's still really weak. But she seems more aware.

    I felt her gullet tonight, and it felt full of liquid so I am planning on blending oatmeal and a little natural b vitamin with a small amount of yogurt to use tomorrow to give her fluids/food. I hope she will be okay too. Thanks so much.

    I do admire the vet and have taken the chickens there many times in their lives, but just don't feel confident it's something the vet will fix. And because of finances, I don't want to waste money (I literally lost my job due to it closing in jun, and I have taken a chicken to the vet before and had him tell me nothing was wrong, though I had to pay the fee and drive the way anyway).

    If I felt it was something the vet could actually help with I would really want to go.

    Does anyone have any ideas of what a large black growth on her nose could be--and a smaller growth under her eyelid, and also some whitish growth in the roof of her mouth, and labored breathing is? If anyone does, thanks. I thought it was wet fowl pox, but I can't know for sure.

    Thank you so much for your wellwishes though--and thank you for replying. I really appreciate it and it makes me feel a lot better!
     
    Last edited: Apr 7, 2016
  5. Chicky Woos123

    Chicky Woos123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Oh no problem. I'm so sorry, but I'm not sure what those growths could be. Could you maybe ask someone you know who has had chickens for a long time? Is the farm store that far too? I'm sure they'd be happy to give some advice. I'm sorry that I don't think that I can help any further, but ideally do hope the hen gets better!![​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
  6. Fakeflowers

    Fakeflowers New Egg

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    Thanks.

    Update--I had given her water last night hoping she might improve by morning. In the morning she was listless and could barely keep her head up. I felt her crop/abdomen and it was soft like she still had water in it.

    In the afternoon I decided that the likelihood of her improving was low. She was simply breathing and sleeping. I couldn't get ahold of the animal shelter, which I wasn't sure if they would euthanize her. And I also thought maybe all the extemely loud barking there wouldn't be the best place she would die. And the vet is pretty far away and only works some days a week, so I didn't think I would be able to get her in anytime soon. Plus, not sure that would be the best place for her either.

    So I decided to try to make a CO2 chamber with hydrogen peroxide and baking soda. She seemed to just fall asleep, but she did not die. I waited, and tried to add more and she still did not die, though she did seem calm and just tired...considering she was already nearly catatonic though, it wasn't so different except she was just more tired.

    I decided that the best way to end her suffering, rather than just leaving her to slowly die was to snap her neck with a broom handle. So in the evening I brought her out and layed a towel down for her to lay on and did the broom handle. At first I couldn't get myself to do it but I also didn't want to leave her suffering. I think it was the right thing to do. Then dug a hole and buried her. We raised her since she was a chick and she was the nicest of all the chickens (buff orpington). We sprinkled rose petals above her grave and so now she's resting in peace.
     
  7. Chicky Woos123

    Chicky Woos123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Im so sorry about your little buff Orpington!! It's hard to have a sick beloved little pet. It was very kind on your part to end her suffering though. I wish I could've offered more advice, but I'm not exactly a chicken expert. I hope that you get through your loss okay. I'm so sorry again. But I hope that the rest of your hens will be healthy and happy, as was this little hen, for a long long time!
     
    1 person likes this.
  8. Fakeflowers

    Fakeflowers New Egg

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    One thing that I am concerned about is that I still have one hen...she was also raised with my other chicken since they were chicks. I was planning on giving away the last hen to someone who had a flock so that she wouldn't be lonely. But since I think the buff orpington died of fowl pox, I don't feel that would be responsible.

    She's fine--energetic...amazingly still laying eggs. She's an americana. And she's spry. But I am afraid she may contract the fowl pox. I'm not sure if I can get her a vaccination at her age. Does anyone have suggestions of what to do to help keep her safe? I am planning on giving her water with vitamins and she sleeps in a different coop area than the other chicken did, though they still did have contact while the other was sick. I assume just trying to keep her healthy is important. The good thing is that she's very adventurous and has spent a lot of her time out in the larger part of the garden, rather in the part of the yard that's specifically for the chickens...I was thinking of moving her living space since she's the only one. But not sure. If anyone has any ideas for a lonely hen, please let me know.
     
  9. Fakeflowers

    Fakeflowers New Egg

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    I really appreciate your kind words through all of this. There is only one hen left (out of three), and I want her to be happy and healthy as well. Thank you very much for your well wishes!
     
  10. Chicky Woos123

    Chicky Woos123 Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 10, 2016
    No problem! I know how hard it is to lose a beloved pet. I just lost one today actually. He was an aquatic snail though, he wasn't a chicken. His name was Bobby. I hope you'll get through this, which I think you will, and that you can keep your hen happy and healthy for as long as possible!![​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    1 person likes this.

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