Sick Chicken

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by RuBaltLion, Feb 16, 2017.

  1. RuBaltLion

    RuBaltLion Out Of The Brooder

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    I have a Jersey Giant hen who is sneezing and sounds a little wheezy. I have put both electrolytes and probiotics in there water and mixed them. My cuckoo maran pullet had the same thing but she has gotten better in a day. I think its a cold similar to a humans cold. Is there any other treatments I can try? Please and Thank You for your help.
     
  2. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    I use Tylan50 and it has help with most of mine(had 1232 chickens at one time). 1ml in the back of the throat(oral) for 3 or 4 days. Good Luck
     
  3. adamsfamily9909

    adamsfamily9909 New Egg

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    Feb 16, 2017
    Tylan50
     
  4. RuBaltLion

    RuBaltLion Out Of The Brooder

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    How do you give the Tylan 50 orally is there a special syringe for it?
     
  5. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    Just a syringe that will hold a few ML. My hands are kinda big so I get the 10ml----you will need a pack of needles----about mid size. I draw it out the bottle---1ml then I pull the needle out the rubber on the bottle---then draw the syringe a little more to empty the needle. I remove the needle and stick the syringe at the back corner of the chickens mouth and ease it in----holding its head back so he swallows. Some inject----I have never done that and have great results.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2017
  6. RuBaltLion

    RuBaltLion Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for your guys help.
     
  7. RuBaltLion

    RuBaltLion Out Of The Brooder

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    Is there an alternative way to treat it without using Tylan 50?
     
  8. PD-Riverman

    PD-Riverman Overrun With Chickens

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    I do not know---I am sure someone will know. Is there some problem you have heard of---using tylan50?
     
  9. RuBaltLion

    RuBaltLion Out Of The Brooder

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    I have not heard anything negative about Tylan 50. I was hoping for an alternative that I could give her immediately. Our local feed store is a mom and pop store that will have to order the medicine. I gave her some water with boosted with probiotics and electrolytes ( Brand: Sav A Chick) and kept her warm in the house and I think the wheezing is calming down
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict

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    Tylan 50 and 200 can be good antibiotics to treat mycoplasma (MG) and coryza. If you are just dealing with a virus, such as infectious bronchitis, then you may not need Tylan. Tylan injectable is about the only antibiotic available in feed stores any more since the beginning of 2017. For use, a 3ml syringe with a 22 gauge needle can be used to with draw the medicine from the vial. It can be given into the breast muscle , but some prefer to give it orally (take the needle off the syringe.Here is some infor about the difference between IB and MG:

    Infectious Bronchitis

    Synonyms: IB, bronchitis, cold
    Species affected: Infectious bronchitis is a disease of chickens only. A similar disease occurs in bobwhite quail (quail bronchitis), but it is caused by a different virus.
    Clinical signs: The severity of infectious bronchitis infection is influenced by the age and immune status of the flock, by environmental conditions, and by the presence of other diseases. Feed and water consumption declines. Affected chickens will be chirping, with a watery discharge from the eyes and nostrils, and labored breathing with some gasping in young chickens. Breathing noises are more noticeable at night while the birds rest. Egg production drops dramatically. Production will recover in 5 or 6 weeks, but at a lower rate. The infectious bronchitis virus infects many tissues of the body, including the reproductive tract (see Table 1). Eggshells become rough and the egg white becomes watery. (See publication PS-24, Egg Quality, for other causes of poor egg quality.)
    Transmission: Infectious bronchitis is a very contagious poultry disease. It is spread by air, feed bags, infected dead birds, infected houses, and rodents. The virus can be egg-transmitted, however, affected embryos usually will not hatch.
    Treatment: There is no specific treatment for infectious bronchitis. Antibiotics for 3–5 days may aid in combating secondary bacterial infections. Raise the room temperature 5°F for brooding-age chickens until symptoms subside. Baby chicks can be encouraged to eat by using a warm, moist mash.


    Mycoplasma gallisepticum

    Synonyms: MG, chronic respiratory disease (CRD), infectious sinusitis, mycoplasmosis
    Species affected: chickens, turkeys, pigeons, ducks, peafowl, and passerine birds.
    Clinical signs: Clinical symptoms vary slightly between species. Infected adult chickens may show no outward signs if infection is uncomplicated. However, sticky, serous exudate from nostrils, foamy exudate in eyes, and swollen sinuses can occur, especially in broilers. The air sacs may become infected. Infected birds can develop respiratory rales and sneeze. Affected birds are often stunted and unthrifty (see Table 1).
    There are two forms of this disease in the turkey. With the "upper form" the birds have watery eyes and nostrils, the infraorbitals (just below the eye) become swollen, and the exudate becomes caseous and firm. The birds have respiratory rales and show unthriftiness.
    With the "lower form", infected turkeys develop airsacculitis. As with chickens, birds can show no outward signs if the infection is uncomplicated. Thus, the condition may go unnoticed until the birds are slaughtered and the typical legions are seen. Birds with airsacculitis are condemned.
    MG in chicken embryos can cause dwarfing, airsacculitis, and death.
    Transmission: MG can be spread to offspring through the egg. Most commercial breeding flocks, however, are MG-free. Introduction of infected replacement birds can introduce the disease to MG-negative flocks. MG can also be spread by using MG-contaminated equipment.
    Treatment: Outbreaks of MG can be controlled with the use of antibiotics. Erythromycin, tylosin, spectinomycin, and lincomycin all exhibit anti-mycoplasma activity and have given good results. Administration of most of these antibiotics can be by feed, water or injection. These are effective in reducing clinical disease. However, birds remain carriers for life.

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    Last edited: Feb 17, 2017

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