Sick chicken

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Trimpkey, Mar 17, 2018.

  1. Trimpkey

    Trimpkey Chirping

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    Dec 22, 2016
    Rural Virginia
    My rhode island red was found huddled in the corner of the coop. She is raising herself as upright as possible. Pressing her body right into the corner of the coop like she's trying to be invisible. Some poop around her backside area. She is eating and drinking. Other birds are leaving her be. I don't like to see an animal suffering. She is basically just huddling there. No discharge from nose or anything.
    Ideas or thought please?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Apr 3, 2011
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    How old is she, and when did she last lay eggs? Has she lost weight throughout her breast area, or does she have a swollen lower belly? She sounds like some I have had that were suffering from a reproductive disorder, such as internal laying, egg yolk peritonitis, or ascites. Also feel of her crop to see if there is food in there, or if it is puffy or firm. Look her over under her vent and elsewhere for signs of lice or mites. Offer her some chopped egg, her usual feed, and water. Do you have any electrolytes or vitamins?
     
  3. Trimpkey

    Trimpkey Chirping

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    Dec 22, 2016
    Rural Virginia
    she is abbot 12 months old and has begun to lay again again as we've had some warmer weather. her weight looks normal. I will check the things you suggested and reply.
    thank you.
     
  4. Trimpkey

    Trimpkey Chirping

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    Dec 22, 2016
    Rural Virginia
    she has a very swollen stomach. it is draggin g on the ground and feels hard and swollen. there ia nothing protruding from her vent. she can barely walk
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    I would check inside her vent with a finger inserted an inch or two (use a disposable glove if you have one) to check for an egg. A very swollen hard belly could be ascites or fluid in the belly, or internal laying. Internal laying and egg yolk peritonitis usually cause them not to lay eggs. Ascites can be a sign of heart or liver failure, and is sometimes seen with EYP. I had 3 hens recently who were older and died during the cold winter. All 3 had ascites with amber fluid common out of their bellies when I opened them up after they died.
     
  6. Trimpkey

    Trimpkey Chirping

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    Dec 22, 2016
    Rural Virginia
    Update: I have isolated this chicken now as the others have started to peck her. She is still eating and drinking but it appears she has broken her leg or dislocated her hip?? I felt her leg and it seems normal but she can't put any weight on it. We don't think she has a disease or is egg bound at this point. She has a lot of poop on her behind and can't seem to sit properly. She is laying a lot on one side or with her leg stretched behind her. Any suggestions or comments appreciated.
     
  7. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Enabler

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Hopefully, it is not something like Mareks disease. That can cause weakness in one or both legs or wings. Sometimes other chickens can sense disease or weakness in a flockmate, and pecking them may be common. I have witnessed this several times in a dying chicken.
    In the event that it is an injury, I would make her comfortable, place food and water close to her in a pen or a dog crate. If you should lose her, I would contact your state vet for a necropsy to test for Mareks. The body needs to be refrigerated , not frozen, and shipped on ice packs.
     
  8. Trimpkey

    Trimpkey Chirping

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    Dec 22, 2016
    Rural Virginia
    Update: After several days in a large dog crate in my duck pen- my chicken has improved! She has a limp but can walk and is not dragging the leg with a wing splayed out for balance like before. She is eating and drinking and seems healthy and alert.
    I tried to put her back in with her flock and most of the chickens ignored her but one had to jump on top of her in full attack mode. So she was immediately put back into the crate. Maybe in a few more days she will be healed with whatever injury she had. Then I will have to try to integrate her into the flock again which can be stressful for me and the chicken!
     

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