Sick peahen won't eat or drink and is very lethargic...

CrazyBirdLady7

In the Brooder
6 Years
Sep 30, 2013
33
0
45
My almost 2 year old, very domesticated peahen hasn't eaten or drank anything on her own in over 24 hours. I took her to a vet last night who was able to give her some IV fluids and an Ivomec injection. We started her on a 3 day treatment for a bacterial infection too. This was all at about 7pm last night and as of 7am this morning I hadn't seen any improvement. I've been able to get her to swallow some peas and carrots and have been dipping her beak in her water dish to entice her to drink. She shows a little interest in her food but when she tries to eat she starts shaking her head like she's trying to shake something off of her beak. She's been extra sensitive about things getting on her beak, especially water, and wants to immediately wipe it off. The vet swabbed her throat and examined it but there's nothing lodged, no visible worms, no mucus. Her poop is white and clear, very liquid and mucus like. She did have some substantial "stinky poops" at the vet but could have been due to all the poking and prodding. I keep my bird inside most of the time, especially at night, but since it's been nice, I've kept her outside in her pen during the day. Shortly after I started doing that is when she stopped eating and started acting weird. I hadn't wormed her in several months either. So the vet thinks we might be looking at gapeworm, or a combo of bacterial infection spurred by a parasite? Not exactly sure. So I'm looking for advice, tips, ideas, because I am very attached to this bird and will be devastated if I loose her :( Also, does anyone know how long it should take the meds to kick in or when I should start seeing improvement if they're working? Thanks!
 

DylansMom

RIP 1969-2017
6 Years
Jan 10, 2014
3,742
585
248
PA
My almost 2 year old, very domesticated peahen hasn't eaten or drank anything on her own in over 24 hours. I took her to a vet last night who was able to give her some IV fluids and an Ivomec injection. We started her on a 3 day treatment for a bacterial infection too. This was all at about 7pm last night and as of 7am this morning I hadn't seen any improvement. I've been able to get her to swallow some peas and carrots and have been dipping her beak in her water dish to entice her to drink. She shows a little interest in her food but when she tries to eat she starts shaking her head like she's trying to shake something off of her beak. She's been extra sensitive about things getting on her beak, especially water, and wants to immediately wipe it off. The vet swabbed her throat and examined it but there's nothing lodged, no visible worms, no mucus. Her poop is white and clear, very liquid and mucus like. She did have some substantial "stinky poops" at the vet but could have been due to all the poking and prodding. I keep my bird inside most of the time, especially at night, but since it's been nice, I've kept her outside in her pen during the day. Shortly after I started doing that is when she stopped eating and started acting weird. I hadn't wormed her in several months either. So the vet thinks we might be looking at gapeworm, or a combo of bacterial infection spurred by a parasite? Not exactly sure. So I'm looking for advice, tips, ideas, because I am very attached to this bird and will be devastated if I loose her :( Also, does anyone know how long it should take the meds to kick in or when I should start seeing improvement if they're working? Thanks!

Normally, most of us put our Peachicks on the ground around 8-12 weeks of age. At this time they come in contact with all kinds of nasty little"bugs" that can sicken them, we keep an eye on them and medicate if necessary, some do need treatment and others never miss a beat. This also gives them a chance to become exposed and build up some natural resistance to these bugs. A bird that has spent most of it's life inside, may be a little immunocompromised due to a simple lack of exposure. That said I would normally not think of Cocci in a 2 yr. old, but maybe in this case. Do you know what the vet gave her for the bacterial infection? The IV fluids were great.... big help there.
thumbsup.gif
And where are you located? Gapeworm is not too common in the northern states. Also Pictures of her poop could help a lot.

Most maladies are treatable, the key is usually keeping them alive long enough for the medicine to do it's job. They have fast metabolisms and they can go downhill very quickly, but the reverse is true also, they can recover remarkably fast. Are you able to tube fluids and possibly bird formula if necessary?
 
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CrazyBirdLady7

In the Brooder
6 Years
Sep 30, 2013
33
0
45


This isn't a picture of hers but it looks like this (but all white, no brown or green).
We are located in southwest Michigan out in the woods.
I'm a bit afraid to try and tube feed her because I don't want to do something wrong and make things worse.
However, I have a small syringe that I have been feeding her with. She's very comfortable with me so I can easily handle her.
I'm at work and don't have the medicine with me but she called it "SBT" or something like that. I know it's light pink in color, cherry flavored, and I'm supposed to give her 1/2ml once a day for 3 days...
 

KsKingBee

Crowing
7 Years
Sep 29, 2013
6,609
3,946
472
The Scenic Flint Hills of Kansas
Normally, most of us put our Peachicks on the ground around 8-12 weeks of age. At this time they come in contact with all kinds of nasty little"bugs" that can sicken them, we keep an eye on them and medicate if necessary, some do need treatment and others never miss a beat. This also gives them a chance to become exposed and build up some natural resistance to these bugs. A bird that has spent most of it's life inside, may be a little immunocompromised due to a simple lack of exposure. That said I would normally not think of Cocci in a 2 yr. old, but maybe in this case. Do you know what the vet gave her for the bacterial infection? The IV fluids were great.... big help there.
thumbsup.gif
And where are you located? Gapeworm is not too common in the northern states. Also Pictures of her poop could help a lot.

Most maladies are treatable, the key is usually keeping them alive long enough for the medicine to do it's job. They have fast metabolisms and they can go downhill very quickly, but the reverse is true also, they can recover remarkably fast. Are you able to tube fluids and possibly bird formula if necessary?

DylansMom is always spot on with her information. The first thing I would encourage you to do is get the necessary equipment for tube feeding. If you have a local medical supply ask them for a 60 ML syringe and about an FR 30 catheter, the latex one with the bullet end. Make sure the catheter fits the syringe, you need the one with the large end. Go to the pet store and get Kaytee baby bird food. Pedialyte and some liquid baby vitamins for making up the feed for tubing.

@casportpony should be along soon with more help and directions on tube feeding. There may also be some medications that could be administered in the tubing, liquid Corid for Coccidiosis, Metro diazol (Fishzole) for blackhead, or Safeguard for Goats for worms would also be good to have on hand.
 

DylansMom

RIP 1969-2017
6 Years
Jan 10, 2014
3,742
585
248
PA


This isn't a picture of hers but it looks like this (but all white, no brown or green).
We are located in southwest Michigan out in the woods.
I'm a bit afraid to try and tube feed her because I don't want to do something wrong and make things worse.
However, I have a small syringe that I have been feeding her with. She's very comfortable with me so I can easily handle her.
I'm at work and don't have the medicine with me but she called it "SBT" or something like that. I know it's light pink in color, cherry flavored, and I'm supposed to give her 1/2ml once a day for 3 days...

If you haven't read this article, it is very helpful. Using a syringe for feeding is the same as it is for oral dosing, key is to keep everything away from that windpipe in the center. By using a syringe, you are in effect already tube feeding her, just with a very short tube. What have you fed using the syringe? The Kaytee formula is good and in a pinch I have used regular baby food at my vets suggestion. Could the med have been SMZ/TMP ?
 
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DylansMom

RIP 1969-2017
6 Years
Jan 10, 2014
3,742
585
248
PA
It might be SMZ...
I've been giving her mashed up peas and carrots...

If it is the SMZ/TMP I think it will cover cocci as well as e-coli, and maybe some other things as well. Peas need protein too maybe some raw egg yolk mixed in. I fed mine Gerber chicken and veggies baby food. I'd water it down a bit too, more fluids going in won't hurt. The last time I had a really sick young one, I had to tube food, medicine and water for about 2 days and then he started eating on his own.
 
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