Sick pullet not responding to medication! Help!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by ANelson726, Aug 26, 2013.

  1. ANelson726

    ANelson726 Out Of The Brooder

    I have a golden sexlink pullet who has been sick for about a week now. She is about 20 weeks old. A week ago we were told she was a cockerel, so we gave her to a farm in the area. A few days later we realized our mistake and brought her back home.

    She only spent a couple hours with my flock before I noticed some bloody mucus coming out of her nostrils. She has been in a dog crate in the garage ever since. None of the other chickens have shown any symptoms thankfully. I gave her some Tetramycin in her water the second day. I use a syringe every night to make sure she is getting some of the medication.

    It has been over 5 days on the medication now with no improvement. Her symptoms have not gotten any worse though. Her eyes are still clear, and she is eating well. A few days ago I noticed her poop was bright green. I read up on the forum here and found several people explaining that this was a sign of excess bile in her system. I gave her a couple soaks in a warm epsom salt bath (which she seemed to enjoy very much.) The green poop disappeared. That problem seems to have been solved. But I am still worried about her respiratory problems.

    She has mucus on her beak from her nostrils, and her lungs sound a bit bubbly. She coughs and sneezes several times a day. I am wondering, are there any other treatments I can try? Has anyone else had similar problems?

    [​IMG]
     
  2. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

    59,750
    18,011
    801
    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    You could try Tylan or Baytril.

    -Kathy
     
  3. War Chicken

    War Chicken Chillin' With My Peeps

    272
    12
    100
    Oct 18, 2011
    http://www.octagon-services.co.uk/articles/mycoplasma_sensitivity.htm

    If you're dealing with Mycoplasma and it's a good bet you are, Table 1 lists antibiotics and the concentration range for them to be effective. Lower numbers are better. You can see that tylosin and oxytetracycline, have upper ranges of 400 and 200 µg/ml, indicating resistance to those antibiotics.

    Tetracyclines also bind to metal so you have to stop any mineral supplements and avoid metal containers and hard water (I recommend distilled water).
     
    1 person likes this.

BackYard Chickens is proudly sponsored by