Sick roo, maybe maerks, should I eat him?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by TheMatador, Oct 27, 2009.

  1. TheMatador

    TheMatador Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 20, 2009
    Upstate, NY
    hey all,

    I have a giant cornish x who never got slaughtered on schedule. He's now 20-25 weeks old. He's always been the target of the evil guineas (despite their huge size these cornish x just dont have any fight in them) so when I found him with his head buried in the corner this morning it was no surprise. I noticed that he was beaten up much worse than I've ever seen him allow before. He may not put up a fight but hes good at hiding his head from attack usually. I picked him up, took him out of the coop and placed him on the ground to se how he's doing and he cant stand. Seems like his left leg and wing are not working well. Inspected for cuts, breaks, swelling and there;s nothing. He had a limp on the same side since he was very young (figured he injured himself somehow) but it has gotten steadily better and was almost completely resolved, so it may not be related.
    The wing and leg have much more of an uncoordinated/partial paralysis look to them than than they do a musculo-skeletal injury kind of look.

    Anyway, considering:

    A) He's the target of aggression from many angles

    B) He is either very injured or very sick

    C) He's a giant cornish x who was supposed to go to freezer camp anyway

    ....I decided pretty much as soon as I saw him this morning that its time to put the old boy down. Question is: Should I eat him? If the culprit is Maerks for instance, is there any reason he shouldn't meet his destiny as a stew bird?

    Thoughts appreciated.
     
  2. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Tempe, Arizona
    Mareks is not transmissible to humans; however, it is a cancer spread by a virus! The thought of knowingly eating any ill animal is icky. The thought of eating one with cancer acquired by a virus? [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] [​IMG] Not logical, but then I am not necessarily a logical person.
     
  3. TheMatador

    TheMatador Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 20, 2009
    Upstate, NY
    Thanks. I was certainly leaning that way.

    I kind of see eating a chicken as the greatest respect you can pay it (after giving it a safe and comfortable life) and just hate to waste such a large bird.

    Marek's is so common I was hoping someone would be able to say definitively that its perfectly safe to eat him. I guess not though.
     
  4. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Well, I don't eat chicken EVER. (But give me a good steak or pork chop, and ...)

    It probably is okay, but it just sounds like a disgusting idea to eat an animal you know was ill.
     
  5. TheMatador

    TheMatador Out Of The Brooder

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    Jul 20, 2009
    Upstate, NY
    [​IMG] Poor Limpy Lester [​IMG]

    Guess he and I have an appointment with a hatchet and shovel....
     
  6. tulie13

    tulie13 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 12, 2009
    NW Florida
    Hey, Matador - I just got online after being off for a while, and saw your message and this post. I'm sorry about your roo, but I also agree with the others, I don't think I'd eat him if there's a chance he's sick, even if it's something that "supposedly" isn't transmittable to humans. Tell Lester "bye" for me. [​IMG]
     
  7. cicene mete

    cicene mete Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Something else to think about. Chickens with Marek's disease become extremely weak and are therefore susceptible to lots of other diseases. They would not be able to fight off parasites or bacteria like they normally would. The danger in eating America's diseased chicken might not be the disease itself but rather other pathogens that infect the weakened bird.
     

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