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Sick rooster, what to do?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Eleanorkwc, Oct 19, 2013.

  1. Eleanorkwc

    Eleanorkwc New Egg

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    Hi, my husband and I are in our first year of chickens and are loving it. Our barred rock rooster (10 months old) has been listless for two days, reluctant to leave the coop when given the option to free range, and has diarrhea. His crop feels fine. He lives with five hens and they are fine. We know to put ACV in the drinking water (he is still drinking) and we tried to give him yogurt but he refused it. He usually loves it. We have no idea what is wrong or what to do. Any suggestions are most welcome. We live in NW Montana near Kalispell and are not aware of any avian vets in the area.
     
  2. realsis

    realsis Crazy for Silkies

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    Does he have any other symptoms? How is his breathing? Any noises when he breathes? Does he have any discharge from his nostrils? Any sneezing or coughing? Look listen and feel for any more clues as to what is wrong. Chickens can be very good at hiding illnesses. More clues are needed as to figure out the problem.
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    If there are no other symptoms present, such as the respiratory symptoms mentioned above, then I think I'd treat for coccidiosis first and then deworm him after that. (unless your birds are already on a regular deworming program).
     
  4. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    I would deworm him first, unless he has blood in his droppings. The symptoms seem like they could fit either a worm infestation or Coccidiosis. Really, it could be either of these diseases, or neither of them. A good dewormer would be Safeguard or Valbazen. If worming doesn't change anything, or if he gets worse, treat for Coccidiosis. Corid, either liquid or powder, is the treatment for Coccidosis.
     
  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    I agree that it could be either or neither of these things. The thing is that if it by chance IS coccidiosis then time is not on your side to wait around a week or two to see if deworming has any positive effect. It can kill quickly, even in older birds, and the sooner it's treated the better the chance of survival. With worms it is a slower process and a wider margin of time to treat before they are lethal. So I would still suggest a course of Corid as the first treatment so you can at least rule out that possibility.
     
  6. Eleanorkwc

    Eleanorkwc New Egg

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    Thank you for these questions to consider. I really appreciate it. I am going to keep them for future reference. Several people mentioned a particular illness so Monday we will call our vet to find and avian veterinarian so that we can get the medication and dewormer.

    And to answer your questions, no idications of anything related to respiration.

    Eleanorkwc
     
  7. Eleanorkwc

    Eleanorkwc New Egg

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    Please excuse me for replying twice. it is an accidnet and I cannot figure out how to simply delete the "reply" window
     
  8. Eleanorkwc

    Eleanorkwc New Egg

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    OK, now I am getting the hang of how reply works.

    Thanks to everyone who suggested Coccidiosis and de-woming. As mentioned above, we will call Monday to find an avian vet.

    Are there any particular supplies/medications that do not require prescriptions that we should have on hand?
     
  9. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Dewormer and Corid do not require a prescription and can be found at Tractor Supply or most any decent feed store. Generally found in the cattle dept. Corid is available in liquid or powder form, labeled for calves, either is fine. The dose for the liquid is two teaspoons per gallon of water for 5 to 7days. Make it up fresh every day. Dose for the powder is 1 teaspoon per gallon, same directions otherwise.

    If you ask a vet for dewormer they are likely to give you Ivermectin or to suggest Wazine. Neither are effective wormers. Wazine will only take care of round worms and there are many other worms chickens will get. I would look for Valbazen at your feed stores or Tractor Supply or it can also be ordered at various places on-line. If you can get some Valbazen the dose is .5 ml for standard size birds, give it undiluted with a small syringe or eye dropper, repeat the dose in 10 days. Liquid Safeguard for goats is also a good one that is usually easy to find in feedstores, dose is the same.
     
  10. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    Actually, I believe that the Corid powder dosage is 1.5 teaspoons. There is a lot of controversy over it (many people use 3/4 teaspoon, 1 teaspoon, etc), but Casportpony has found out the correct dosage, mathematically, several times. Apparently, the correct dosage is 1.5 teaspoons.
     

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