Sick silkie

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by zivaC, Feb 26, 2015.

  1. zivaC

    zivaC Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 15, 2014
    Hi everyone,

    I have a 20 week old silkie who has begun to act a bit strange lately. So basically I started to notice last week she was sitting down more often than usual, however her appetite was normal and she was eating well and still gets up and plays as usual but just sits down more in between. A few days ago she was limping and we noticed a hard ball of poop stuck and built around her toe nail and so we cleaned it up for her and she started walking normally thereafter- I thought this may have been the initial problem. But she's still sitting more often and now I've noticed her poop has like a stringy red line through it and I wonder if there's something more serious brewing up with her? I have attached a photo of her poop.

    What can I do? Does anyone know what this could be? She seems otherwise healthy. [​IMG][/IMG]
     
  2. zivaC

    zivaC Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 15, 2014
    [​IMG]
     
  3. zivaC

    zivaC Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 15, 2014
    [​IMG]Anyone?
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2015
  4. jannakaye

    jannakaye Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jul 28, 2014
    Mississippi
    Are the bottoms of her feet okay? If they have little scabs on them she could have bumblefoot. Not sure about the poop..
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    I would probably start her and the rest on Corid (amprollium) in the water for 5 days to treat for possible coccidiosis, especially if more than one dropping has looked like that. It can be normal to have occasion shed intestinal lining in droppings that looks like stringy chunks of tomato, but that looks more like blood. Was she vaccinated for Mareks disease? That can cause lameness or paralysis of a leg or wing, and can decrease resistance to common diseases such as coccidiosis. Of course, simple leg sprains and bumblefoot can cause problems walking. I would probably start some poultry vitamins in the water or feed, just in case she has a vitamin deficiency, but wait until she is finished with the Corid first. Corid is a cattle medicine found in feed stores. Dosage is 2 tsp of the liquid Corid, or 1.5 tsp of the powder per gallon for 5 days.
     
    Last edited: Mar 2, 2015

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