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  1. NampaChikenLady

    NampaChikenLady Out Of The Brooder

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    May 19, 2012
    Nampa, Idaho
    I think one of my girls is sick and I don't know what to do. She was fine this morning and I came home on lunch and she's all by herself in a corner. Her color seems off, wheezing while she breaths and she won't let me put her down now that I've picked her up ( she NEVER let's me hold her) I don't know what to do!
     
  2. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    If you've put her back in the coop, go back out there 'n get her. You should make sure she's warm, and isolated from contact w/ others. Most probably, others will show similar symptoms. If so? Isolate them as well.

    Give all of your birds an astringent solution of Apple Cider Vinegar at the rate of four teaspoons to the gallon (but not in galvanized containers), as this will help them more easily expel mucus, and remove the coatings w/in the mouth, throat and intestines, improving uptake of nutrients/vitamins, which will also serve to boost their immune systems.

    This could also be the result of internal parasites, for which you could worm her (and the rest) w/ fenbendazole at the rate of 20 mg/kg for three consecutive days. This is an extremely effective anthelmintic against all internal parasites except tapeworms at this dosage, and it's been proven safe to levels 50 times higher ...

    Keep a close eye, from a distance, on the rest of your flock, and be sure 'n update this thread w/ any other symptoms you may discover.
     
  3. NampaChikenLady

    NampaChikenLady Out Of The Brooder

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    May 19, 2012
    Nampa, Idaho
    I removed her from the rest of the flock as soon as I noticed she wasn't feeling well.
     
  4. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

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    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    If she were mine I would:

    • Bring inside right away.
    • Weigh and record weight. I use a cheap digital kitchen scale from Target.
    • Do thorough exam.
    • Dust for mites/lice with poultry dust even if I couldn't see any .
    • De-worm with Safeguard for Goats/Cattle (fenbendazole 100mg/ml) at the rate of 50mg/kg ( .5cc/kg) by mouth.
    • Place in box or plastic bin with access to food, water and heat.
    • If not eating and crop is empty, tube feed Pedialyte. Once hydrated, tube feed baby bird food.
    • Watch closely for 24 hours.
    • Maybe start on antibiotics.
    • Weigh daily.
     
  5. NampaChikenLady

    NampaChikenLady Out Of The Brooder

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    22
    May 19, 2012
    Nampa, Idaho
    She passed away this morning. Checked on her at around 6 and she seemed to be doing about the same as yesterday. Checked on her an hour later and gave her water and she started falling over and had a seizure.
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    56,652
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    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop
    So sorry for your loss.
     
  7. NampaChikenLady

    NampaChikenLady Out Of The Brooder

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    22
    May 19, 2012
    Nampa, Idaho
    I hate to sound clueless but what do I do with her? Can I just burry her in the backyard? First time I've had to deal with the loss of a pet.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Poop Inspector General Premium Member

    56,652
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    Jun 24, 2012
    My Coop

    I bury the ones that I don't send off for necropsy. If you want to know why she died, that's your other option, necropsy.
     
  9. cowcreekgeek

    cowcreekgeek Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Sep 14, 2012
    Hurricane, WV
    I'm sorry to hear that ... big red flags go up when any chicken dies almost immediately after symptoms present, so I'd consider having a necrospy performed (although the results most often arrive to late to provide any immediate benefit in the case of contagious viruses). It can be helpful to know.

    With the keeping of chickens, which are fragile and temporary by their very design, you will have this happen on occassion ... it's hard, sometimes, but you focus your thoughts 'n feelings as quickly as you can upon those that remain. Your flock may be at risk, depending upon what caused her death.

    Your local extension service can provide additional information, any you may possibly obtain necropy at reduced costs by contacting them:

    Canyon County Extension Offices
    501 Main Street
    Caldwell, Idaho 83605
    Phone: (208) 459-6003
    Fax: (208) 454-6349
    E-mail: canyon@uidaho.edu
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2012

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