Sight Barrier Material for Peafowl Pens

bdfive

Songster
9 Years
Jul 11, 2010
846
101
199
South of Blanco, TX
Does anyone know where I can find some sight barrier material to attach to the welded wire between pens to stop the males from fighting? I can't use plywood or metal because it's to darn hot here in South Texas. I need something air/breeze can penetrate through. I need about a 100 feet that is 2' high or can be cut to that size without raveling. Thanks much!!!!
 

mnferalkitty

Songster
7 Years
May 17, 2012
1,386
26
131
Minnesota
can you use that camoflage fabric/netting type stuff that you get at army surplus stores?, or how about going to a fabric store and getting canvas
 

Fowler Hencock

In the Brooder
8 Years
Jun 11, 2011
85
0
29
We have a giant roll of woven black garden fabric that we use. It allows some air to pass through, but birds can't see through it. You can buy it at Lowes or Home Depot in 4' x 50 or 100' rolls. Easy to staple it to your wooden posts, or use roofing nails.
 

AugeredIn

All Fowled Up!
9 Years
You would think there would be something good for this purpose out there, but I have been severely disappointed. Here are my experieinces:

1. Roofing Tin. By far the best material. Must be 36" in height or you are waiting your time. No air pass thru. By far most expensive option.

2. Garden Weed Fabric. Cheap by comparison. Hard to keep it up. It is relatively flimsy and tears easily in the wind. No air pass thru but is a great site barrier. WAY too much trouble for us. We have tried various kinds and thicknesses.

3. Poultry House Siding. Couple of years ago was offered the plastic/material siding off of four chciken houses. Almost passed it up as was most interested in tin. This material is incredibly durable and will pass some air thru. The problem is that it is not a complete site barrier. For us it works well enough to keep the peacocks from head striking each other but we still get some psychotic attachment to walking along the barrier. Best material found to date but expensive unless you get it free like we did.

4. Black plastic sheets/rolls. Save your money. Tears down too easily in any wind.

While it does not pass any air thru, our favorite is the roofing tin. Both of our new pens have tin as the dividers. Above the tin and between adhjacent covered portions of the pens, we use the poultry cloth only during the brreding season. We roll it up out of the way during fall/winter. You must make the barrier at least 36" tall. Any less and they will just crane above it and head strike.
 

featherhead

Songster
11 Years
Feb 1, 2008
231
17
121
Kentucky, USA
The key to using landscape fabric is to staple it to both sides of the wire. We can get some high winds and rough weather during the spring, but I've used the same landscape fabric for 3 years. Just pull it down after breeding season, then hog-ring it back up in February. Don't get the cheap stuff 'cause it won't last.
 

bdfive

Songster
9 Years
Jul 11, 2010
846
101
199
South of Blanco, TX
I had some of our expensive metal roofing up in one pen last year and it looked great. Problem is the hot weather. We'll get days over a hundred. Some of the pens are shaded.....lots of trees but when the sun hits it you can't touch it. Hot enough in the pens without generating more heat. Also, no air flow or breeze. It's 97 right now, have fan in each of the 4 pens and water misting on but birds still panting. I've seen sight barrier material on internet but pretty sure it can't be cut......heights are more then 3 feet. I know there is something out there.....hopefully someone will share the information. I need to put up about a hundred feet so want something that will last. To much work to put up and take down or replace often. Important that air/breeze passes through. Thanks everyone.
 

frenchblackcopper

Crowing
10 Years
Jul 14, 2009
2,787
206
261
East central Illinois
Has anyone thought of silt fence? You see it around construction areas where loose dirt can be blown during heavy winds,,I think it's an EPA requirement on new construction projects where topsoil is removed and not replaced for more than a week. It is about 24" tall and is black poly film,it's super heavy and sometimes landscapers have scrap rolls left over they will sell for practically nothing.
 

featherhead

Songster
11 Years
Feb 1, 2008
231
17
121
Kentucky, USA
Another thought - you know the panels used for the bottom of trailers? I've been told that those are excellent sight barriers and come in 3' high sections. They should be readily available. They are all lighter colors, too. I've heard they aren't very heavy and fairly easy to work with. I was going to hunt for some this week to see what they're like. My only issue with something like that is, if you have high winds, they are just like a sail. They can catch the wind and possibly take down part of your fence.
 

Kedreeva

Longfeather Lane
10 Years
Jun 10, 2010
2,348
407
286
Michigan
I know you said you can't use plywood, but if you don't mind wood as a material, you could try a "woven wood" fencing along the bottom. The sort that has 2 rows of vertical slats, one on either side of the center support, alternating so that there's no actual gaps straight through, but wind can pass through it. Kind of like this: http://www.obra.at/images/sichtschutz5_big.jpg
How to build them:
http://www.diynetwork.com/how-to/how-to-build-a-privacy-fence/index.html

Alternately, and I don't know how expensive this would be, but there are companies like this that sell cloth privacy fencing- these guys even have a 'noise reduction' privacy fence... http://www.privacyfencesolutions.com/

There are also mesh screen tarps, which are breathable and since they are not natural fibers, won't rot or mold. http://tarpsurplus.com/privacy-fence-tarps.html
 

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