Silkie Chick - Need Help!

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by dawn secord, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. dawn secord

    dawn secord Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 12, 2016
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    I have a 4 month old buff silkie. He (or she) has a tick that is getting worse. Though lately, I think it has settled at what it is going to be. Will the other silkies pick on it with this condition? What can I expect. I'm not sure if I should return it to the breeder or not. I'm pretty attached to it at this point.

    Thank you for any advise.
     
  2. Carpenter

    Carpenter Out Of The Brooder

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    Silkies and other birds with lofted skulls are susceptible to head injury. I had one silkie that had a tick where he would wobble his head like a bobble head. The other birds did not seem to treat him any differently and he lived a normal life. I would advise you to keep the silkie and hopefully it will be just fine.
     
  3. dawn secord

    dawn secord Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Wow - what a truly needed and appreciated response - thank you. I will keep him. He keeps standing between my legs when I go check on him. I've been bringing him in my art studio at night - over protective I guess.

    I have three silkie chicks (they are 4 months old and he is one of them) - all from a show breeder. They are with my older hens, 2 six year old silkie hens and a small three year old bantam frizzle. It appears all the 4 month old chicks are cockrells. One is maturing and covering the hens. The patridge is maturing the quickest next and then my little wobbler the buff. Do you think I can keep any of the other roosters as they age or will they pick on him. The breeder said he will take back any roosters and rehome them. Thank you for your time and advice. I am quite the novice - just a hobbyist.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
  4. Carpenter

    Carpenter Out Of The Brooder

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    You're welcome. I am the same way when it comes to my flock. It is hard not to be over protective when you see any of them get picked on but it is normal for the pecking order to be established.

    My buff bantam silkie roosters got along with each other for the most part. I had two silkie roosters and two silkie hens mixed in with the rest of my flock. It is a guessing game as to whether they are going to get along or not. The problem will usually become apparent in the spring when their hormones start kicking in. It is a hard decision to make but it is necessary to try and make the best choice for the flock as a whole.

    I have had to rehome a few roosters in the past couple years and it is never easy. If they start to get aggressive and actually hurting each other then you know that it is necessary. You ultimately know what is best for your flock. Go with your instincts.

    Here is a picture of my boys together in the snow. The one on the left had the wobble.
    [​IMG]

    Feel free to contact me if you have any other questions.
     
  5. Carpenter

    Carpenter Out Of The Brooder

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    Here is one of my silkie girls.
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
  6. dawn secord

    dawn secord Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Your boys are gorgeous. Thank you for the advice.

    I think I'll take the black one back to the breeder. He is quite sweet but not as interested with interacting with me which may be due to his sexual maturity. We'll see how the patridge does. If he starts picking on the buff, I'll have to return him to the breeder as well.

    Tough decisions.

    I had a silkie rooster before and he was very aggressive. I had to rehome him. Thus far, all three of my cockrells are gentle tempered. No telling what will happen when the patridge and buff reach sexual maturity. Being pets, I don't need or want any aggressive birds.

    Thank you again.
     

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