Silkie - Deformed Foot has Infected Toe

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Chaoth, May 19, 2019.

  1. Chaoth

    Chaoth In the Brooder

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    Hello. I have a silkie (her name is Choji), which is about a year old now. The first day we got her, as a little chick, we noticed she had a deformed foot. One of her toes was tucked under her foot, and it was healed within a few days so we had no chance to change that.
    Recently it's been raining a lot, so the ground in their coop got very muddy. I noticed today when I checked on them all that her toe (which is folded under her foot) was puffier than normal, and it was nearly white (I only noticed her toe when I picked her up). It looked like there was a small puncture wound - no blood. When I touched it (very gently), it was slightly squishy, and it was cold. I'm not sure if this is something that will turn fatal or not, but do you guys have any suggestions to help her? I haven't tried anything yet since I found out this morning, but she doesn't seem bothered by it. She runs and scratches fine, and she didn't react when I touched it. I couldn't get a picture of it, but I could maybe try later on if it'd be helpful to see it (my mom or dad would have to hold her while I take a picture or vice versa). Thanks! If it turns bad we will probably take her to the vet, but until then any suggestions would be great! Thanks!

    P.s. She stopped laying after she got broody about a month or two ago, could this be the reason for that? Y'know, because of stress?
     
  2. Hencraze24

    Hencraze24 Songster

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    Can I see a pic?
     
    Wyorp Rock likes this.
  3. Hencraze24

    Hencraze24 Songster

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    I have a buff silkie that had the same issue, but this was from frostbite. her toe swelled up to three times it's size, ripped open, and eventually half of it fell off. (sorry if that was graphic). Surprisingly, she was fine . She never noticed, and never bothered to treat it. (just like yours). That was 4 months ago and she is alive and well to this day.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
  4. Chaoth

    Chaoth In the Brooder

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    I'll have to go get her again, the whole flock is kind of skittish. Give me a few minutes.
     
  5. Hencraze24

    Hencraze24 Songster

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    OK. If she is foraging, that is a good sign. to reduce the risk of infection, wash out the wound. (chickens LOVE a hot shower :)) If I had to guess, she stubbed it on a sharp stick and cut it or something. If it seems if it is getting infected, separate her with newspaper bedding and see if it gets better. If not, the vet is the best way to go.
     
  6. Chaoth

    Chaoth In the Brooder

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    upload_2019-5-19_14-17-3.png
    This is her foot from two angles. My dad(who's holding her) said it might just be a callus, but those aren't usually squishy.
    Would an Epsom salt soak help her, maybe? I heard of someone else doing it, but my mom said it can be poisonous to some animals. The nail hasn't fallen off yet, by the way.
     
  7. Chaoth

    Chaoth In the Brooder

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    Also, do I need to cut her nails? They seem really long, but someone else told me they use the long nails to scratch.. plus that foot is deformed, so the nails can't wear themselves down normally.
     
  8. cottagecheese

    cottagecheese Songster

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    In wet, muddy situations, the skin on their feet softens, and then it is very easily 'breached' and bacteria enter and we get bumblefoot.
    You don't need to separate her, don't need to take her to the vet, but I'm afraid you'll have to become a Walmartian for a few minutes and acquire in the pharmacy there an ointment called PRID. A youtuber had the idea to use this on bumblefoot and the treatment was very successful. I posted the videos here:
    https://www.backyardchickens.com/threads/bumblefoot-help.1310876/ post#4
    I think PRID will work well for Ms.Choji, and will drain the infection just like it does for cystic acne sufferers, the reviews on amazon are very positive. I always mention that gloves should be worn, because the 'salve' can be easily contaminated by our hands. So if you 'll use it, wash with plain water, dry and apply PRID liberally all over the swollen area and bandage. Then should check once a day, it should begin draining in the first 24hrs. Then reapply daily and bandage, continuing for a few more days after it heals. :)
     
  9. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Enabler

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    Hi @Chaoth :frow Welcome To BYC

    Can you soak the feet in a warm epsom salts bath, gently clean the dirt off the feet, underneath too. Take some more photos once you have her cleaned up - photos of the bottom of the feet and of her too would be great.

    It's fine to use epsom salts for soaking chicken's feet. I wouldn't let her drink the bath water, it will probably give her diarrhea.

    Yes, I would trim the nails, take a little at a time over a period of weeks to get them shorter. Especially on the toe that is curled under.

    Muddy conditions can make foot problems worse. Can you add some straw to your run?

    If you have a vet that can see her, it would be best.
     
  10. Hencraze24

    Hencraze24 Songster

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    Yes, this is beyond me and what you may be able to do to help the poor thing. I would recommend seeing a vet.
     

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