Silkie Pile Suffocation Victim?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mountainmud, Feb 17, 2018.

  1. mountainmud

    mountainmud Chirping

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    Hello all...(this is actually my first ever post here) I’ve recently (with int the last year) been losing my silkie hens to what I’m guessing is “silkie pile suffocation” and am hoping someone has some suggestions:
    1) to prevent silkie piles and 2) what to do with my recent victim.

    This morning I found one of my 3.5 month only silkie pullets still in the coop after all the others were out. She was alert, but moving in what I can only describe as drunk and wobbly with her neck crinked (made up word) toward her left side. I put her in the run with the others in hopes she would eat and drink, but she will not. I came back to find her laying in the corner at which time I brought her inside. She responds when I pet her and will take water from a syringe but is more interested in ‘sleeping’. She has been healthy and active up until today, so I’m guessing that she may have been stuck at the bottom of the silkie pile last night with little to no oxygen? Any thoughts on how to revive/save this little girl? She is the 3rd hen I’ve lost like this in the past year and I’m really discouraged by the loss.

    Additional information: I feed them Nature’s Best Organic Feed (Tractor Supply) with Rooster Booster mixed in during the winter. They were out foraging during our first warm snowless day (2 days ago). I’ve raised chickens for about 10 years now, but only recently (last year) went to an all Silkie flock.

    Any thoughts on preventing Silkie piles? Thanks so much!
     
  2. Crazy for Chickens!

    Crazy for Chickens! Crowing

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    Do they have roosts?
     
  3. mountainmud

    mountainmud Chirping

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    Yes, they do have roosts, but only one chicken will use them. We’ve tried putting them up on them at dark, but they always end up in piles by morning.
     
    Crazy for Chickens! likes this.
  4. Crazy for Chickens!

    Crazy for Chickens! Crowing

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    Okay. The trick to this takes time, and patience. You need to start going out when it is dusky, and they are settling in for the night. If you go out when they are asleep, it doesn't do anything. Is there a specific place where they huddle? If so, put a box, or something in that place, so they can't go there. Then, when they try to sit, pick them up, and put each one on the roost. If it is dark enough, they should stay there. It will take time, but if you don't ever allow them to go back, and you put themon the roost before they do their own thing, it should work. Some catch on pretty quickly, and will already be rooted in a couple nights. Also, are ou sure it's not too cold in your coop,at night? Make sure you don't put them close too a mean chicken, on the roost, because that will discourage them.
     
  5. mountainmud

    mountainmud Chirping

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    We tried putting them on roosts every night for about a month before winter came. We did have a very cold winter, therefore I let them do what they wanted to stay warm. We will have to go back to roosting them individually at night again. Thanks for the response. Any thoughts about the ‘sick’ pullet? She’s actually my most immediate concern.
     
  6. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Free Ranging

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    Which formula are you using - layer, grower/starter? What is the mill date on your bag?

    Drunk, wobbly and crinkled neck in a Silkie sounds like Wry Neck to me. Wry Neck is a symptom of conditions like vitamin/nutritional deficiency, head/neck trauma and certain disease like Marek's and Avian Lymhpoid Leukosis.

    I would separate her out - if you have room, cage her in the run or coop. Provide her with Vitamin E (400IU), Vitamins B (1/4 tablet human B-Complex vitamins, no iron) and some egg or tuna for Selenium.

    It's very possible that she may be suffering from Marek's. If you happen to lose her, then consider sending the body to your state diagnostic lab for testing. Having your location in your profile is helpful when giving information.

    If she is having difficulty eating/drinking, then she may need some help
     
    Zoe_tx and N Sully like this.

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