Silkie Roo beat up by WPR Roo

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by lgallert, May 23, 2016.

  1. lgallert

    lgallert New Egg

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    May 23, 2016
    So, my Silky roo, Harvey, got the beat down by my White Rock Roo, Peepers. Harvey has been picking fights and I've been keeping them separate but they were both free ranging last night and I found Harvey in a heap. I brought him in and cleaned him up and he was in shock. I've keep him warm under a brooder heat lamp and have been syringing chick boost. I took a close look at the damage this morning and it looks like he has a very deep hole in his comb, like his comb has been separated from his head. It has been 36 hours and he is still very weak, shocky and can't really stand at all. HE seems like he may have neurological damage. I don't want him to suffer, so I am wondering how long I should give him? How long should I wait to see improvement? I gave home 10ml of chick boost this morning, but I had to go to work so he will not get anything else until I get home. He isn't eating or drinking on his own at all. He is knda sitting normal, but really can't walk or control his legs very well. Thoughts?
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Welcome to BYC. He will need some extra care eating and especially drinking until he gets on his feet. Keep him separated from others until he is back to normal, and I wouldn't let him near the larger rooster. He will always lose those fights. It may take several days to nurse him, in order to tell if he will make it. Is there anyone in your family that could care for him inside while you are gone? Sick or injured chickens may need extra warmth, offered fluids often with a dropper or even tube fed. Poultry vitamins and electrolytes will be helpful for awhile.Let us know how he gets along.
     
  3. lgallert

    lgallert New Egg

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    May 23, 2016
    I've been doing some research today and found out that Silkie roos do not have a complete cranial bone and I am especially worried that he has a traumatic brain injury. Unfortunately, I don't have anyone that can care for him while I am at work. I am going to leave early and go home to care for him, but I am really unsure if I should, if he is just suffering. I do have a co-worker who said he will cull for me if needed. I guess I will just go home and access his condition and decide to continue or not. I'm heartbroken for my little guy.
     
  4. lgallert

    lgallert New Egg

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    May 23, 2016
    so I came home tonight determined to put Harvey out of his misery, since he would no longer let me syringe water. As I sat there watching him and wondering if putting him down was the right decision, I got an inspiration! I went and got one of his silkie hens and put her with him, he started talking to her a little but still wouldn't walk eat or drink. Resigned to the fact that Harvey was just to far gone I opened the door to let the hen return to the yard and much to my surprise he followed her out so I threw some food down and he went over and tried to call her over, he was wobbly on his feet and his voice wasn't quite right so she didn't come over but I thought I saw him eat a little! For the next half hour he followed her around as best he could since he is listing to the right when he walks. So at coup time I put him and his hen in a separate part of the coup and he immediately went over to the feeder and started to eat! I think he just might make it! Putting him back with his hen seemed to give him the will to live! Hopefully he will continue to improve.
     
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    That is great news. Some silkies have a vaulted skull, while others do not. The vaulted skull can make them more prone to head injuries. I really hope he recovers, so let us know if there is any news. Try adding some water to a small bowl of feed to make it soupy. You can even stir in some raw egg or yogurt, and that may be tempting to eat.
     

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