Silkie Rooster Foot Badly Swollen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Pollo_Loco, Oct 22, 2014.

  1. Pollo_Loco

    Pollo_Loco Out Of The Brooder

    My 1 kilo, 18 month old Silkie Rooster has a badly swollen foot. Photos included. Probably not bumble foot but bacteria maybe entered via feather shaft or from side of foot? No visible scabs.

    About a month ago determined rooster had a bad case of scaly leg mites and treated by drenching feet/legs in mineral oil after a shampoo foot bath. Put in the coop for the night. Did this about 4 times over several weeks, used Vaseline on the really bad areas of the toes. About two weeks ago used four drops of IVERMECTIN for cattle for the mites but the mineral oil was/had worked OK.

    Rooster seemed OK but noticed a little swelling of the pad of one foot and researched and had determined it was probably mild bumble foot. Within one week the swelling had more than doubled. Close inspection revealed one relatively large “Foot feather” was broken off close to the side/top of the foot pad. Pulled the broken stub and almost NO bleeding.

    A HARD object was trying to grow through the foot skin. Decided to open the top of pad /foot skin over the hard object. Did not find any “puss” or yellow cheesy “stuff” but there was some “thick red blood” that oozed out when the pad was “massaged/squeezed”. Couldn’t identify the hard object and didn't want to make matters worse.

    Closed up, used disinfectants, triple/ointment (non medicated), gauze and Vetwrap. Today, started a three day regime of ampicillin (250mg per day) just in case.

    Could this be a “foot feather” problem. No problems on top of foot. Photos taken before cutting open foot/pad. Anyone experience similar swelling of foot?

    Living in a small rural Colombian town. Need some advise? What to do next?
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    Last edited: Oct 23, 2014
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I would suggest some strong antibiotics such as Baytril, but with amoxicillin, you will need to increase the dosage and do it longer than 3 days. I'm pretty sure that amoxicillin dosage is 250-300mg per day given in 2-3 doses for chickens, and I would give it for 7 days. Procaine Penicillin G injections are also sometimes used for staph infections as in bumblefoot. Just wondering if it could be a tumor or cyst. I haven't seen anything similar, but maybe others will have.
     
  3. Pollo_Loco

    Pollo_Loco Out Of The Brooder

    Eggcessive: Not sure why I didn't get email notification about replies to my post but Thanks for the quick reply and noting my error on dosage.

    Edited my post to correct it to 250 mg per day (not 25).The mfg. recommend the following dosage and I more or less doubled it: Your suggestion is more in line with the majority of vendors.
    (This is the Spanish/English Translation).
    DOSE : 2-4 tablets x kg every eight hours for 3 days at least. Oral.Treatment should be bird by bird by placing the tablet on the peak and pushing until the animal pass. Release it and let it eat and drink normally. http://www.soydelcampo.com/vademecum_veterinario/productos.php?id=4395&prod=MAIZ-ANTIBIOTICO

    The easiest way to administer tablets: 1. squeeze the middle out of a grape,, give it to the chicken. 2. Place one or two tablets inside the NOW HOLLOW GRAPE SKIN feed it to the chicken,, mine will JUMP to get it and never seem to recognize the pills. They'd OD if I had a lot of grapes.

    Doubt the ampicilina will help the REAL problems with the foot but hoping it won't get infected from my "exploratory cutting". Foot looks fine and seems healed after only two days.

    A cyst seems as good a guess as any,, hoping to give my VET some more suggestions,, he's seen pictures. Problems is,, who would bother spending over a few dollars on a chicken in Colombia? (believe I have the only silkies),, Thus he has very little (if any) experience with chickens,, same with parrots,,, he's where the money is,, dogs and cats. He has a surgical area in his office an it would be great if he knew birds/chickens.

    This has been distressing, to say the least. There are quite a few drugs available but something like Epsom Salts or more exotic like Vetericyn can't be found. No problem ordering from Amazon but it takes two to three weeks from the time "BUY" is clicked to arrive at my house in Colombia.

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  4. Pollo_Loco

    Pollo_Loco Out Of The Brooder

    VET made a house call today to look at the Rooster. His opinion was the rooster had two or more problems. Foot was infected due to feather breakage and scaly leg mite damage. Second problem is there a probability of a cyst or tumor.

    Prognosis was that after surgery the problems might return in 3 or 4 months.

    Drats,, my ignorance about the mites and not recognizing the problem earlier is the primary cause. My opinion now is that scaly leg mites have the potential to cause more damage to breeds with feathered feet.

    Surgery is scheduled for Monday at my house. No food Monday morning. Vet says he will use a local "deadening" injection in the foot and/or breast. Didn't quite catch exactly what he said but maybe someone has some advice on preparing for "chicken surgery" and some do's and don'ts.

    Doubt he will mind pictures but many people do not like pictures taken BY STRANGERS, regardless whether their faces show or not.
     
    Last edited: Oct 24, 2014
  5. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Epsom salts may be available at any drug or grocery store in Columbia under the name magnesium sulfate. It's an old timey laxative and cathartic as well as used to soak sore feet. It's good that you found a vet at least willing to perform surgery. Please warm him that lidocaine, benzocaine, or other local anesthetics ending in -caine, may be toxic to chickens. Some vet students here on BYC have reported that they have used those with great care in poultry surgery without problems, but if the vet will do it without any numbing medicine with you holding him in a towel, I would be tempted to do that. If he insists on it, then I would just hope for the best. Good luck to you.
     

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