Silkie roosters fighting

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Icravepoultry, Feb 25, 2016.

  1. Icravepoultry

    Icravepoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My 2 siklie roosters have been fighting. Is this common?
    [​IMG]
    Here's the damage
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  2. Yorkshire Coop

    Yorkshire Coop Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes if they are fighting over girls in the flock. They are trying to sort the pecking order out about who will be top bird. Looking at your pics you need to seperate these two boys before one or both are killed or die from their injuries. Those are some bad injuries that you need to get and keep clean. My advice would be to keep them seperate from now on.
     
  3. RodNTN

    RodNTN Following Jesus

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    Fighting is usually very common among roosters. I use to have two roosters (I now only have the small one), one much bigger than the other, that use to fight with each other any time the small one would get near the hens. The small one would usually fly up into a tree to get away from the other one.
    I also agree with Yorkshire coop, you need to separate them. I suggest maybe "dividing" the hens up with the roosters, maybe. And make sure the injuries are taken care of, both of the roosters, of course. But especially the white rooster, that one looks pretty serious.[​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  4. Icravepoultry

    Icravepoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    OK I'll separate them. Thanks for the input
     
  5. Bigwig

    Bigwig Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I agree.
     
  6. RodNTN

    RodNTN Following Jesus

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    I own a really helpful book called, 'My Pet Chicken' by Lissa Lucas and Traci Torres. (They also have a helpful website called, My Pet Chicken)
    One of the chapters suggests the following:
    "5 Rules for keeping multiple roosters in your flock:
    1. Have plenty of hens for each rooster
    If you only have a flock of five or seven birds, you don’t want two (or more!) of them to be roosters. Generally—and especially when you want to keep multiple roosters—there should be 10 or 12 hens for each male in your flock. . .
    2. Have plenty of space in your run. With multiple roosters you will need more than the bare minimum of space. You’ll want to double or even triple the minimum space per bird for your flock. . .
    3. If you have neither plenty of hens nor plenty of space, you can keep multiple roosters together by having NO hens. This is an arrangement you might have, for example, if you keep a flock of roosters for exhibition (rather than having a flock of hens for the purpose of laying). With no hens to compete for, multiple roosters often live together in relative peace. . .
    4. Raise them together in your flock. Roosters who are raised together establish a pecking order between them as they are growing up. Because they have already established that order, there is less incentive to fight when they are older and more likely to hurt one another by sparring.
    5. Some roosters are too aggressive to get along with other roosters, no matter how ideal the conditions are. There are some breeds that tend to produce very aggressive roosters that are prone to fighting amongst one another,. . ."

    I really hope this helps[​IMG]
     
  7. Icravepoultry

    Icravepoultry Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Thanks. Yes they are with no hens currently. And have 36 sq ft for the 2
     
  8. RodNTN

    RodNTN Following Jesus

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    Your welcome, and that's fine.[​IMG]
     

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