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Silver Laced cochin roo to Gold laced cochin hen.... what do you throw

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by dday911, Mar 23, 2009.

  1. dday911

    dday911 Out Of The Brooder

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    Just curious. I got 5 gold laced hens and no roo. I have a silver laced roo, a blue roo, mottled roo, and was wondering how to "produce some more gold laced chicks and eventually have a gold laced roo.
     
  2. Msbear

    Msbear Fancy Banties

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    You can absolutely put your silver laced roo with you golden laced hen.

    The biggest problem with crossing patterned chickens is disrupting the pattern or creating a kinda pattern on a solid bird.

    Your roos and hens share the same pattern. The first generation.. I believe you will get either silver laced or golden laced and not real great color of each but 2nd generation will bring back to where you wanna be. I've heard of this discussed before so maybe someone else will chime in.

    I know it will not hurt anything ...just not sure about how long it will take to get good color back
     
  3. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    If I remember correctly, that's a sexlinked cross, but the offspring will not breed true. Normally you would cross a silver female to a gold male and the result would be gold females and silver males. You can breed the reciprocal cross, but the male offspring should not be bred as they can throw silver... or something like that. Don't quote me on that. Whatever happens, you can always cross the same pattern. Golden Laced and Silver Laced are the same pattern, just as BBRed, Golden Duckwing, and Silver Duckwing are the same pattern. You'll have to concentrate on color for a generation or two, and it is very difficult to get quality silver birds from a gold x silver mating (they are always brassy). Silver is dominant to gold, but when both genes are present you get gold tinted silver.
     
  4. MoodyChicken

    MoodyChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    So either cross (whether gold female on silver male or vice versa) results in males that carry one gold gene and one silver gene. The females can only have one, gold (silver f x gold m) or silver (gold f x silver m). Hope that's not too confusing. I might be totally wrong... punnet squares aren't always my friend. lol
     
  5. big medicine

    big medicine custom Brahmas

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    Quote:Crossing the silver male onto the gold female should produce silver females and bad brassy silver males. Crossing your best brassy male back to the gold hens should produce 25%silver females,25%gold females, 25%true gold males,25%brassy silver males. Now if you add the silver females from the first cross to this pen with the brassy silver male they should produce 25%silver females,25%gold females, 25%good silver males,25%brassy silver males. So in summation, breed the silver male to the gold females. Keep the best type and laced brassy silver male ,put him over a pen of both colored females , and this will produce males and females of both colors, plus some brassy silver males for the pot.
     

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