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Silver-laced wyandottes

Discussion in 'General breed discussions & FAQ' started by shandea, Mar 21, 2007.

  1. shandea

    shandea Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2007
    I am going to pick up 4 SLW chicks this weekend. I can't wait to get them, as I've been reading and researching so much (with help from all of you!) and am ready to put this knowledge to work.

    I just have a question about the breed. The answer doesn't matter, as I'm committed to this breed now and found exactly what I had my heart set on. But I'm reading Storey's Guide now and it says that Wyandottes are not a laying breed... maybe only laying every 100-some days per year. Is this really true? To those of you with Wyandottes, what have you noticed with yours? I guess I was under the impression that they would lay almost an egg a day when I decided on this breed. And we LOVE eggs!

    That's still OK I guess, for a family of 3... I was just hoping to have some to give away so that our neighbors would like them too.

    Also, what does 'partridge' mean when referring to chickens? Perhaps I'll get to it eventually in my book, but I'm impatient and can't find it online. What about 'game'?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2007
  2. pegbo

    pegbo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Feb 8, 2007
    I've got one silver laced wyandotte and she lays an egg everyday! She's been doing this since she was about 4 months old. She sure is pretty! So go for it. They are a very gentle breed and I wish I had got more.![​IMG]
     
  3. shandea

    shandea Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2007
    Oh wow! That's great to know. Yes, I'm getting them regardless, but it's a plus if they are good layers. My first priority was that they are nice and gentle, since I have a 4 yr old animal lover. I also chose to raise them from chicks so they will be well-handled. I read that these are a really pleasant breed as far as that goes.

    Another plus is that I think they are absolutely gorgeous birds!
     
  4. keljonma

    keljonma Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 12, 2007
    8A East Texas
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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    I have three SLW's. It's a rare day that I don't an egg from each, but they do skip a day or two more a month than, say, my Barred Rock girls. I love the Wyandotte Sisters, as I call them. Very sweet, lowkey with cute little-girl voices they talk to me with all the time. You'll like them very much. It does take a few months for that beautiful lacing to truly emerge, but suddenly you'll see it right before your eyes, whereas before they just looked streaky and awkward.
     
  6. shandea

    shandea Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2007
    Well, seems to be the trend... that they ARE good layers! You all are making me not be able to wait for Sat. [​IMG]
     
  7. Picco

    Picco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 14, 2007
    NY
    I have two old SL wyandotte hens, Lotty and Dotty, around 8 years old (I've had them for 6 years and they were adults when I bought them) and they still lay very well. I've been getting an egg a day from them for the past couple weeks. They are great birds, friendly beautiful and hardy. They are what my parents call "people chickens" and they seem to always follow us around the yard and even pop their heads in the dog door once in a while (good thing they havn't figured out how to use it!) I will be moving in June and I plan on starting a breeding flock of SL and blue laced reds. They are my favorite standard breed. Good choice Shandea!
     
  8. shandea

    shandea Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 17, 2007
    I've also been reading that when they molt (sp?) they stop laying until that processed is finished. But no where have I read how long that process takes. Is it a couple days, a couple months? And is it in the fall? Sorry, don't have my book with me to reference at work.

    Then my next question was going to be 'when do they stop laying for good?' Picco, do you just have extraordinary chickens, or do they all lay for long?

    Thanks!
     
  9. Picco

    Picco Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Mar 14, 2007
    NY
    Molting, or moulting (spelling doesn't matter) is very variable and differs greatly among flocks and within them. It can occur anytime form late summer to earlier spring but usually occurs during the fall. In my flock each bird molts at a different time and in different degrees. Some birds loose nearly all of their feathers all at once while others loose only a couple at a time. The procces takes anywhere from a couple of weeks to a few months. Egg production drops and sometimes stops completely during the molt. If its a bad molt (major feather loss) the hen will not lay because her body is conserving proteins to make feathers instead of eggs. If the molt is slow (losing/growing feathers slowly) the hen might lay an egg here and there but her production will be less than before. Nutrition is very important during this time. I increase the protein in their diet by adding nonmedicated game starter crumbles to their regular laying ration. This protein increase allows for optimum feather quality.

    Peak laying for chickens in a commercial setting is only about 2 years, after that production falls; however in small home flock hens will lay longer. Egg production falls with age and older hens will still lay (sometimes quite well) but never as well as the younger ones. For a home flock you can expect good egg production for at least 4 years if not longer provided the hens are fed correctly. My hens are not extraordinary (although I'd like to think so [​IMG]) its just that they are fed well and live a good stress free live in my backyard. I don't think egg production ever stops in chickens, as humans are the only species known to experience menopause, but it greatly degreases and very old hens will hardly ever lay. Egg production in commercial (factory farm settings) hens probably does stop comepletely but that environment is unnatural and stresses their bodies out extremely.
     
  10. chickenwire

    chickenwire Out Of The Brooder

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    nova scotia
    not my favorite breed hens are docile but not the best layers compared to rhodes barred rocks etc weve had the roo we have is extremely aggressive and not even nice with his hens doesnt call them over to eat like our others will do with their hens he dives right in ( all about him) lol wouldnt have them again with so many others like australorps rocks etc that are so much better in so many ways in my opinion
     

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