Silverlaced Wyandotte Male or Female? Here's what I learned....

Discussion in 'What Breed Or Gender is This?' started by mamabear_eisenhauer, Jun 24, 2011.

  1. mamabear_eisenhauer

    mamabear_eisenhauer Out Of The Brooder

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    Here's what I've figured out about sexing with my own chicks. I thought I'd share in case it might help someone else out.

    I got my silverlaced wyandotte chick at 1 week old. Based on what I read about feather sexing, and our previously successful attempts at pubic bone testing, we were fairly certain that Juneau was probably a girl. The rate and location of feather growth seemed to be on par with what I've read from others who have been able to use feathers as a gender test.

    By the time Juneau was about 3 weeks, I was noticing some behaviors my hens had not exhibited at the same age, even the queen of the roost. Juneau stood more erect, his scraggly little tail was generally held up, and he frequently asserted himself over his broodmate, Sakura (a white silkie pullet 1 week older but the same size). By asserted I mean he'd push her around, he'd hop/fly at her, etc. There was a lot of posturing but nothing violent or mean. My dominant hen did not start getting pushy with the other girls till she was much older. Juneau was the same size as Sakura but taller because of his carriage. At this point, we also noticed that his comb area was very large, but still no more than a faint pink, so we still weren't positive. The wattles were coming in but weren't huge.

    By 4 weeks, my husband took a closer look at him and declared him a roo. His comb had become a definite red, and his wattles were coming in fast. The wattles were very definitely red too. When people tell you that pullets have smaller, yellower/paler combs than roos at the same age, it's true! And it's definitely more obvious than you might think just from reading about it. For me, once I saw it for myself, I got it. But at the time, I really wasn't sure (partly wishful thinking--I wanted him to be a her!!!). Then my husband pointed out something I couldn't refute....on Juneau's legs were tiny little spur buds, like little warts on the insides of his legs. I've read a lot about how to sex on this site, but for some reason I've never seen anyone mention this. Spurs have to come in some time, right? And I knew that NONE of our girls had those little bumps on their legs.

    Long story short, we can't have roos where we are, so we took him back to the ranch were we got him to exchange for a pullet. Once we could see him with the girls his age, it was clear he was a boy. His comb by comparison was very red, and our new girl's is smaller and yellow. She has almost no wattles compared to him.

    I meant to take some pics of his comb and especially of the little pre-spur bumps, but I got busy and forgot. Hopefully this is of some help though.
     
    Starboardlabs likes this.
  2. TeriyakiChicken

    TeriyakiChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I had exactly the same problem with my SLW roo [​IMG]

    P.S. Hens and Roos both have spur buds but roo's actually grow really long
     
  3. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Most of your post is right on target. It's very kind of you to help out with something that everyone here on the forums is very concerned with.

    However, the 'spur buds' you are talking about are present on BOTH genders from an early age.

    Those buds are very similar to the dewclaw on a cat or dog. In hens, they are pretty useless, and do not develop beyond a bud. On a roo, the spur-bud grows a protien shell just like humans grow fingernails. This is what becomes the 'spur'. Unfortunately, spurs are pretty much the last male thing to show up on a rooster. The first is the red wattles and posturing you noted, the second is the feathering of the saddles and hackles and/or crowing, and the last is the spurs.

    Hope that helps clear things up a bit!
     
  4. RGBistro

    RGBistro Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Very good information, all. [​IMG]

    Now, another question.

    Does feet size (at less than a week old) have anything to do with it? I picked out 8 chicks this afternoon... got it into my head somehow that I wanted "smaller feet," and "thinner legs." My logic was roos had thicker feet? True or false?

    - Kim
     
  5. TeriyakiChicken

    TeriyakiChicken Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Not at less than a week old, but at a few weeks the roos have large feet & thick legs

    Here is my SLW roo when he was a few weeks old (probably 5?). His feet were really big and that was the first thing that made us think he was a roo.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. Pele

    Pele Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Quote:Ahaha! He's too cute! He looks like he should be rampaging in Tokoyo like Godzilla.
     
  7. mamabear_eisenhauer

    mamabear_eisenhauer Out Of The Brooder

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    May 9, 2011
    I guess I should've clarified the spur buds thing.

    Yes both genders have spur buds present, but my SLW's were MUCH more prominent than the girls of the same age. In fact, none of the pullets I have started developing spur buds until they were older than 4 weeks. So I figure that in combination with the comb/wattle coloration and development should be a pretty good sign.
     
  8. mamabear_eisenhauer

    mamabear_eisenhauer Out Of The Brooder

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    Quote:ROFL....it may be the camera angle but those are some MONSTER feet he's got!! That pic looks like it could be some 1950s horror flick....Revenge of the Rooster!
     
  9. TonyaSwayze

    TonyaSwayze Just Hatched

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    Are these roo's? Screenshot_20170712-172216.png Screenshot_20170712-172303.png
     

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