Sixk Turkey hen, please help! UPDATE with Pics!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by justusnak, Aug 29, 2007.

  1. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    OK, here is the deal....

    She is about 24 weeks old. She was recently moved from one enclosure....to another because the area she was in was too wet. She was fine for the first 2 weeks in her new pen. Unfortunately, I had to have a Rooster and hen in there with the Turkeys untill yesterday. For the last 2 days, she has been just laying around...not really eating much..but eating some. Her poo is watery and green, and I mean BRIGHT green. It has been very watm here...but she has had lots of shade, and fresh water several times a day. Could it just be stress from being in with the Roo? Her mate is fine...up and walking...eating..."talking to me" She sleeps. Help, I dont want to lose her. [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Sep 11, 2007
  2. bantymum

    bantymum Chillin' With My Peeps

    Oh im sorry i cant help you Deb, I hope someone gets on here soon to help you and your little turkey,

    please Help somebody.
     
  3. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    the green in faeces is probably from not eating...
    If you are not already doing so, then give electrolyes/vit in waterer ...
     
  4. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    I have been watching her all day....she wont get up to eat...or drink. She just lays there, sleeping. Now, when I go over to her, she will get up, and walk...tho unstable. I just know I will lose her, and I am so sad...she is such a sweet bird. She has electrolytes and vit in the water...I think I will bring her inside....the garage...and keep a better eye on her. Doggone it....my little Eve is so sick. She wont even eat watermelon. What might I try to convince her to eat!?
     
  5. Pine Grove

    Pine Grove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    sounds like Blackhead
     
  6. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    Pine Grove...if it IS indeed Blackhead....what can I do!?? I just went in there and took her out of the pen away from the Tom. Do I need to treat the yard they are in?? With what? What can I do for her? Help! I read up on blackhead disease....but I dont see what I can do for her....anyone??? please???
     
  7. dlhunicorn

    dlhunicorn Human Encyclopedia

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    There are so many things that could have made your turkey ill...heat stress for instance or any other number of things... what is more important than eating is DRINKING... dehydration will kill your bird quicker than that from which it ails... keep it hydrated and get some testing done (faecal etc.) so you can know what is wrong with it... until you do then you do not know what to treat "it" with.... dribble water along her beak every hour to encourage her to drink...offer live culture yogurt (sprinkle some of her food on it too so it will be moist and not dry... (remembering that dehydration is your greatest enemy)
    Here is info on blackhead:
    http://www.msstate.edu/dept/poultry/disproto.htm
    "Blackhead (Histomoniasis, Enterohepatitis)

    Blackhead is an acute or chronic protozoan disease of fowl, primarily affecting the cecae and liver. The disease is present wherever poultry are raised. Blackhead is one of the critical diseases of growing turkeys and game birds. It may cause stunted growth, poor feed utilization and death. It is of lesser economic importance in chickens since they are more resistant, but the incidence in chickens apparently is increasing.
    Blackhead is caused by a protozoan parasite called Histomonas meleagridis. The organism in passed in the fecal material of infected birds. In many instances, the organism is shed within the eggs of the cecal worm of chickens, turkeys and game birds. Free-living blackhead organisms do not survive long in nature, but those in cecal worm eggs may survive for years. Therefore, most blackhead transmission is considered due to ingesting infected cecal worm eggs. Transmission may also occur by the earthworm.

    Chickens are frequently infected without showing signs of the disease. These chickens may shed enormous numbers of blackhead organisms, many of which are protected by cecal worm eggs. Outbreaks in turkeys can often be traced to direct or indirect contact with ranges, houses or equipment previously used by chickens. Free-flying birds may also contribute to an infection.

    Most blackhead losses occur in young birds (six to sixteen weeks). Among the symptoms are loss of appetite, increased thirst, droopiness, drowsiness, darkening of the facial regions and diarrhea. Morbidity and mortality are variable, but mortality seldom exceeds fifteen percent; however, it may approach one-hundred percent in uncontrolled turkey outbreaks. Losses are usually low in chickens.

    Lesions of uncomplicated blackhead are confined to the cecae and liver, thus the reason for the synonymous term, enterohepatitis. The cecae are ballooned and walls may be thickened, necrotic and ulcerated. Caseous (cheesy) cores within the cecae may be blood tinged. Peritonitis may be present if ulcers have perforated the ceca walls. Livers are swollen and display circular depressed areas of necrosis about one-half inch in diameter. Smaller lesions coalesce to form larger ones. Lesions are yellowish to yellow-green and extend deeply into the underlying liver tissue. Healing lesions may resemble those seen in visceral leukosis.

    Blackhead diagnosis is made readily on the basis of the lesions. Atypical forms, particularly in chickens, must be differentiated from cecal coccidiosis and Salmonella infections in particular. Medications may interfere with atypical lesions. Laboratory tests may be required for positive diagnosis in such cases.

    Good management practices can do much to control the blackhead problem. Do not keep birds of different species on the same premises. Do not range turkeys on ground previously used by chickens unless several years have elapsed. Rotate ranges periodically if possible. Cecal worm control is necessary to reduce blackhead incidence. Wire or slatted floors reduce exposure.

    Good management is the only effective method of preventing this disease since many of the effective drugs used in past years are no longer available commercially. Drugs that reduce the presence of cecal worms, and thus reduce the infection rate, are available but do not have an effect on the Histomonas organism. Refer to the cecal worm section for recommended control practices."
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2007
  8. Pine Grove

    Pine Grove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    First of all, does she walk drawed up, and kinda like she's stumbling forward? If so I'm 99% sure it is blackhead. What you need is metronidazole tablets(fishzole,flagyl, canker tablets) sometimes you can find it at walmart in the pet dept in fish supplies, if not poultry and piegon supply houses carry it.
    If i'ts 250mg tablets give two tablets first day, then 1 tab each day for 5 days, you should see a big improvement, Then in about a week you will need to worm her for cecal worms with levamisole or valbazen, my choice whould be levamisole, I use the sheep oblets 2 per gallon of water, or in her case you can 1/4 the oblet and give down her throat, plus worm all your other birds. of all domestic species, turkeys are the most susceptible. Blackhead is not fun. in 1992 we lost over 400 head of chukar partridge's to blackhead before we got a handle on it
     
  9. justusnak

    justusnak Flock Mistress

    She is not walking "drawn up" When I walk towards her, she will get up...and walk...sometimes stumbling. I was thinking it was from not eating much. Today, I put her in the garage...seperate from the tom. I gave her vit/electrolytes in her water...when offered to her, she drank it...but would lay back down. Her poo started watery very bright green...almost leafy green. Now her poo is watery, yellow. She did eat some feed later today...after I got her to drink several times. I consulted a vet....they said they know of NO treatment, but decided Sulmet,vitamins, and electrolytes would be good. ( Not sure about the Sulmet tho) I called 4 or 5 vets....all said the same thing. I will go look for the other meds you mentioned Pine grove...and I am going to TRY to get a fecal sample for the vet, tomorrow. He said get a spoon..and a baggie. I just hope I can save her. Now, my other question....what about the ground she was on? Is my Tom doomed?? I have NO other place to move him to. Is there something I can put on the ground to "clean" it? Will DE work? I dont want to lose them both...and I am supposed to be getting more Turkeys in a few days. ( only if I know they will be safe)
     
  10. Pine Grove

    Pine Grove Chillin' With My Peeps

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    The watery yellow droppings are indicative to blackhead.Not sure that your vet can determine blackhead from a fecal, as diagnosis is based on typical gross and microscopic lesions, they can however determine if cecal worms are present.
    If so do as I suggested, from experience this works. once you have wormed all of your flock. try to cut down the earth worm population in your coops as they are carriers of the cecal worm eggs, and keep the chickens and turkeys separated. possibly its not even blackhead at all, so many things it can be
    Like dlunicorn said keep check on dehydration, as long as her legs are warm you are ok...good luck
     

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