Skeletal abnormalities...

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chikenlady, Aug 8, 2008.

  1. chikenlady

    chikenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2008
    Cantonment, FL
    I have two hens approximetly 16 weeks old that appear to have some sort of bone abnormality. One of them has what looks like scoleosis in her neck. I call her "hunchback". The vertebrae are not straight...they come out to a point on the right side, then seem to go back in line down her back. Just yesterday, I noticed another hen is looking malformed along her back (one side is higher than the other).

    I have done a search online and on this site and nothing is coming up resembling this problem. Anyone out there know of any skeletal dissorders that would cause neck and back bone malformations?
     
  2. mypicklebird

    mypicklebird Chillin' With My Peeps

    Aug 8, 2008
    Sonoma Co, CA
    What are you feeding them?
    Skeletal abnormalities are likely congenital or diet related (deficient in minerals, protein, vitamins ect).
    Trauma is also a possibility, or infections.
    Trauma is unlikely as you have more than one with a problem, and congenital problem likely would have been obvious prior to 16 weeks, so that leaves us with dietary deficiency or maybe infectious. My guess is dietary- you should look at your feed, when was it milled and by who. If it is older than a month, get new stuff and get commercial diet, not locally milled. Calcium or phosphorous deficiency, Vit D deficiency and Vit C will create similar problems. Vit C & D will degrade rapidly in food. Vit E is also essential for normal growth. Also make sure you have food appropriate to their age. If you bought it from a hopper at a feed store, then you cannot know how old it is, and go get fresh milled, not from a hopper. If you really want to know why they are ill (mostly for the sake of the rest of the flock), and if one dies- then check into if your state has a pathology service. CA where we are has a free service if one sends in the bird. Check and see if you have a local poultry extension agent. Seeing a avian oriented vet is always a good option.
     
  3. chikenlady

    chikenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2008
    Cantonment, FL
    I am feeding Nutena Medicated Starter/Grower feed. The hen with the neck issue started looking that way at about 8 weeks old. I will try to get pictures to post.
     
  4. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    Do they have access to grit?
     
  5. chikenlady

    chikenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2008
    Cantonment, FL
    Yes, they have grit available.
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2008
  6. Jenski

    Jenski Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jun 17, 2008
    Middle Tennessee
    chikenlady, if you have pics it might be helpful. While I can't really diagnose whether you have scoliosis among your hens, here is what my chicken health book says about scoliosis (paraphrased):

    Wry neck and wry tail are two hereditary defects caused by recessive genes ~ this means they appear only when two birds carrying the same gene are mated. Wry or twisted neck results from spinal curvature or scoliosis, and happens as the birds grow. It is more common among brown Leghorns.

    Wry or twisted tail happens when the tail feathers lean or twist to one side due to weakness in the vertebrae holding the tail. It usually becomes apparent when the tail feathers have grown enough to become heavy.


    Although I haven't yet found any information indicating treatments (there may not be any), my book does recommend against using these birds for breeding.

    Hope that helps. I will post more as I find it.


    Jen in TN
     
  7. chikenlady

    chikenlady Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 18, 2008
    Cantonment, FL
    Wow, thanks Jen. You have posted the most information I have seen that seems to match my hens' problem. Thank you, thanks you! [​IMG]
     

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