skinny silver laced wyandotte UPDATE She's gone

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by jeannieo, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. jeannieo

    jeannieo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I noticed yesterday that one of my silver laced wyandotte hens (A.J. for Ashley Judd) didn't seem to feel well. I chalked it up to the extreme cold. Then today when I went out, she was just standing still sort of fluffed up. I got the scale and weighed her and she doesn't even weigh 2 lbs! I feel awful that I didn't notice it before but with all the feathers she looked pretty normal. When I picked her up to weigh her, I checked her vent, not egg bound and her keel bone is so pronounced it's like a knife! Haven't checked that closely for lice/mites but will.

    1) What type of bird , age and weight. silver laced wynadotte, about a year and a half old, not quite 2 lbs.

    2) What is the behavior, exactly. just standing

    3) How long has the bird been exhibiting symptoms? only noticed it yesterday

    4) Are other birds exhibiting the same symptoms? no

    5) Is there any bleeding, injury, broken bones or other sign of trauma. no

    6) What happened, if anything that you know of, that may have caused the situation. nothing

    7) What has the bird been eating and drinking, if at all. I did see her eating pellets today, Layena

    8) How does the poop look? Normal? Bloody? Runny? etc. haven't had a chance to check it

    9) What has been the treatment you have administered so far? no treatment so far

    10 ) What is your intent as far as treatment? For example, do you want to treat completely yourself, or do you need help in stabilizing the bird til you can get to a vet? I plan on bringing her in and putting her in the hospital cage next to the furnace, 3 drops poly vi sol 2X daily, and try to tempt her with yummy foods, like scrambled egg, plain yogurt, oatmeal. I would like to treat completely if I can but am still a novice at having chickens and would take her to the chicken vet if that's what I need to do.

    11) If you have a picture of the wound or condition, please post it. It may help. no picture

    12) Describe the housing/bedding in use 8 X 12 coop, not insulated, pine shavings DLM

    Everyone else seems to be fine. I picked up Katherine Hepburn, my red banty cochin, who is smaller that A.J. but by just picking her up I could tell she weighed more than A.J. She is a sweetie and I don't want to lose her! I'm going out now to bring her in and try to get her to eat. [​IMG] I'm at a loss.
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2011
  2. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Sadly, I think she is probably laying internally. I've lost four Wyandottes to the same ailment. She is building up solidified egg material and infection either in her oviducts or abdomen. If that is what is wrong with her, there is nothing you can do short of a hysterectomy. It's a genetic/hormone based malfunction. With her being that thin, she is in the final stages. I know those symptoms all too well. Lost 9 hatchery hens to the same thing, 4 of those were Wyandottes, three SLW and one GLW. There could be something else wrong, but it sounds just too familiar.

    Do try to rule out worms and/or lice/mites, though, before you decide it's internal laying.
     
  3. jeannieo

    jeannieo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I gave her some poly vi sol, scrambled her an egg and put some plain greek yogurt on top. also some layena soaked in warm water and I crumbled up some of the seed/corn bread I made for them this morning and she is chowing down. Please tell me that's a good sign. [​IMG]
     
  4. ScotianChick

    ScotianChick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I have a very underweight Rhode Island Red hen. She is underdeveloped and her keel bone is extremely pronounced. I like to watch my chickens for hours sometimes to see what's going on and I noticed she was at the very bottom of the pecking order. She was never getting enough food or water because the others chased her away. She also seems to have a heart condition, her heart beats very loud when she's nervous and she will pass out easily. I took her inside, cleaned her up (she was filthy), fed her lots of nutritious food and put booster in her water, kept her in for about 2 weeks and then re-introduced her. Right before I re-introduced her, I killed a very aggressive rooster who had been making her life hell. Now she is still smaller than the others but she actually can eat with them, drink with them and hang out with them.

    I think you should feed her up and keep her warm and cozy for a while and see what that does.
     
  5. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    My own internal layers ate very well up until they were at death's door. That was the alarming part, that nothing they ate helped them gain weight, not with all the horrors going on inside them. I've never had a Wyandotte who was low on the pecking order, but guess it could happen. Mine were always a bit bossy with the other hens, just their confident personalities.

    The only way you'll know is if she passes on or you euthanize her, you can open up her abdomen and you may find your answer. We can't see inside them, obviously, not unless you can get an xray done, of course. Naturally, check and see if she is being bullied away from the feeders.
     
  6. jeannieo

    jeannieo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I still have her in the house but she seems to be only eating scratch and maybe a crumb here and there of the other stuff I have been putting in her cage. She is drinking water and her poop, as far as I can tell, looks pretty normal, although there's not a lot of it but I sort of assume (altho I hate to assume anything) that it's because she's not eating much. If she is in the final stages of internal laying, is it too late for a hysterectomy? She's beautiful, young, and a very sweet bird and I hate to lose her. I know hysterctomy means no more eggs but I don't care. At this point I would just like to save her if I could. A man at work who has chickens said (mighty confidently, I might add) coccidyosis (sp? but you know what I mean). I know that's always a possibility but none of the others are demonstrating any of the symptoms that she has. help? please?
     
  7. speckledhen

    speckledhen Intentional Solitude Premium Member

    Most grown birds are already immune to cocci, though it can happen. Doesn't sound like that to me, but you can worm her and check for lice/mites, but barring those two occurrences, I'd say more likely internal reproductive issues than cocci, especially if it's just her and no other birds. I have no idea when it's too late for a hysterectomy and she may not survive the surgery if you can even get a vet to do it. I've seen masses as big as softballs removed from a hen and she survived, but not all would be so fortunate.

    Remember, this is just my educated guess from her symptoms. I haven't seen her and I'm not a vet (though most vets know diddly about chickens).
     
  8. jeannieo

    jeannieo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    A.J. is eating pretty good now that I'm giving her instant oatmeal with brown sugar and apple cake! should I be giving her grit or would the scratch act as grit. She is eating scratch and drinking lots of water. I decided against hysterectomy, I have 26 others that need to eat and I figure I can buy lots of feed with the money I would have spent on a surgery. Especially since it's not guarenteed she would make it thru the surgery. plus my chicken vet is 45 minutes away and we are having yet ANOTHER snow storm. A.J. seems pretty perky but not understanding why she's in the house so I don't think death is imminent so if the gosh darn snow stops by the morning I will call the vet and see if I can bring her in to have her take a look.
     
  9. Miss Lydia

    Miss Lydia Running over with Blessings Premium Member

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    yes she needs grit thats how she chews her food.
     
  10. jeannieo

    jeannieo Chillin' With My Peeps

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    too late to get grit now, can i giver her grit I got for my parakeets? it's a hi-calcium grit
     

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