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Skittish goat

Discussion in 'Other Pets & Livestock' started by PotterWatch, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. PotterWatch

    PotterWatch My Patronus is a Chicken

    5,470
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    Apr 22, 2008
    Virginia
    So we are really enjoying our first goats and are looking forward to them kidding so that we can get fresh milk. We have only had them for about a month, and I know that isn't much time for a skittish one to settle down, but I am really worried that our little one, Fleur, won't calm down enough to be milked. I can't even get my hands on her at all. She will eat from our hands, but runs as soon as anyone reaches out a hand to touch her. We were trying to get a collar on her this morning, but it turned into a rodeo and I didn't want to terrorize her by chasing her all over so we gave up after about 10 minutes. I am really worried that she will never calm down enough for us to do the everyday things that need to be done, milking, hoof trimming, etc. Is it possible to tame a goat that is so skittish or will I end up needing to replace her with one of the kids to be born soon?
     
  2. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    All of my original goats were buck wild when I got them (no one around here has goats as pets, really - just yard ornaments). Now most of them are pocket pets. It takes lots of time, hand feeding, etc.

    Go ahead and catch her and get that collar on her. It will help you when you want to catch her again.

    My favorite milker, Sarah, was totally wild. We weren't home when she kidded the first time here, so didnt even have that bonding experience with her (for some reason, being there when they kid - reassuring them when they're down and pushing really changes them). The day I weaned her first kid was the first day I milked her. Every day for a week or more it took two people to catch her twice a day to get her milked. Before long...she was waiting at the gate for me to get her. Today Sarah is one of our sweetest does. She snuggles, she adores human contact. She has the best manners in the stanchion and doesn't even require a leash to go from the goat yard to our basement (where I have my parlor)

    My best advice is to have a small stall for them to kid in. Sit in there with her. Help her when she kids. Keep feeding her by hand. Stick with it - they DO come around.
     
  3. kinnip

    kinnip Chillin' With My Peeps

    Feb 24, 2008
    Carrollton, GA
    I have one that's wild like that. Grabbing her and making her stand while I trim hooves, trim fur, etc. made a huge difference in her disposition. We aren't all the way through the woods yet, but she's made a lot of progress. Once she knows that the worst part is the being caught and everything after that is pretty easy, and involves grain, she'll get easier to catch.
     
  4. Chatychick

    Chatychick Chillin' With My Peeps

    Jul 9, 2007
    Blue Mound, Kansas
    Yep they sure can be a hand full when they are wild like that. Routine is the key with some and very slow movements also. They think you are the enemy and are going to eat them. Time and lots of love and petting will help you get them tamer. If you have a small pen to place her in it does help with the taming. I had 1 that we put in a different pen to feed and slowly approached her and talk low and sweetyly and started this way with her. Now she wont leave you alone. Yep time and patience...and routine....
     
  5. Smoky73

    Smoky73 Lyon Master

    Feb 8, 2007
    Colorado
    We have a few like that, one yearling that had her first kid this year and she is still to where we cannot grab her. We end up roping them and then leading them to a stand that hubby just recently built to make it easier on us for hoof trimming and shots and things. (we don't milk) The stand has been fabulous already and we only used it once. Even the yearling, Miracle, she got up on it with the lure of sweet feed and no issues after that!
     
  6. helmstead

    helmstead Chillin' With My Peeps

    Mar 12, 2007
    Alfordsville, IN
    Oh totally - stanchions are not just for milking! Everyone should have one. I use it for everything from milking to hooves to body clipping. Once they figure out they get food up there...they're happy to hop right on and stick their heads in the holder.
     
  7. PotterWatch

    PotterWatch My Patronus is a Chicken

    5,470
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    Apr 22, 2008
    Virginia
    Thanks for the information. I will keep plugging away at earning her trust. We'll have the rodeo to get the collar on her tomorrow, lol.
     

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