Slikie genetics

Discussion in 'Exhibition, Genetics, & Breeding to the Standard o' started by emmarouth17, Jun 21, 2016.

  1. emmarouth17

    emmarouth17 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2016
    I have a paratrage silkie hen that I would like to breed with a blue copper maron cross what cam I expect the chicks to look like
     
  2. mustangrooster

    mustangrooster Chillin' With My Peeps

    If we are expected to answer properly, I think a picture of the pair would be helpful [​IMG]

    -Mustang
     
  3. emmarouth17

    emmarouth17 Out Of The Brooder

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    May 7, 2016
    [​IMG]
    This is penquine the rooster he's only 11 weeks at the minute but I'm hopefully going to breed him next year
     
  4. emmarouth17

    emmarouth17 Out Of The Brooder

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    [​IMG]
    This isn't acctully Stella my girl but its looks simnalar to her pensions
     
  5. Henriettasmum

    Henriettasmum Chillin' With My Peeps

    I started my flock with two Australorpe hens - one copper, one blue - which are similar to the marans; and a pair of white silkies. My silkie roo loved his three girls and as well as pure white silkie chicks from his silkie girl, his blue and copper girls produced a huge variety of different looking birds. I have a multitude of different looking birds. There are pure white hard feathered birds; black Australorpes with a strange tuft on the heads, blue Australorpes with the tuft; pure black with silky feathering; partridge; black shot with green, red and ginger; and my favourite - lavender splash. So, I would imagine you will have some amazing results with the marans. Just have some fun and see what you end up with.
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    Last edited: Jun 26, 2016
  6. Sonoran Silkies

    Sonoran Silkies Flock Mistress

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    Tempe, Arizona
    What is your goal? Why are you crossing breeds?
     
  7. Henriettasmum

    Henriettasmum Chillin' With My Peeps

    It's a bit of a long story so settle back while I explain why we have done this. If you don't wish to read it all, just skip to the second last para for the short answer.

    I originally bought some Indian Runner ducklings for their eggs a few years ago and we built quite a large enclosure for them, with a pool. As they were still young we decided to get a couple of hens also, for the eggs - Australorps (but we didn't know their breed at that time, being reasonably new to this caper - although we did have some silkies back in 1979-80 but therein lies another story!). A local lady sold me two - a blue and a copper - they were gorgeous girls. The pen was then divided to keep the ducks separate. Having loved my silkies when we lived in New South Wales so long ago, I decided to get a couple, jus' fer pretty, if you know what I mean. Buffs (I just called them beige back then!) had been plentiful down there in the 70's and 80's so I decided to get white - a novelty for me. They were gorgeous and were popped into the same pen as the Australorps which were all young. The silkie roo matured and was beautiful. We couldn't see any reason to separate them. He had his three ladies which he looked after brilliantly. They free-ranged during the day but he wouldn't go back into the pen until he shepherded his girls in first. If they were wandering he would go and look for them and bring them back. He's a lovely boy. Nature took its course and we soon found ourselves with silkie babies and also a bunch of mixed. The silkies were adorable - eventually they went into their own pen and later we added some new blood to the flock. The 'street kids' as I called them were so different - to the silkies, australorps and each other. We fell in love with them. After seeing the different colours - black, white and everything in between, including the most gorgeous lavender splash with Australorp body but purple silky comb (she has just spent half an hour sitting on my lap in the sun enjoying cuddles) - rose combs on australorp bodies, black combs, red combs, purple combs etc. my husband decided he wanted to leave them all together and see what the result would be. He has a physical disability and suffers depression from the chronic pain so an interest like this was wonderful therapy for him. He loved all the birds and can be found throughout the day with one in his arms. We love all their differences. Every now and then we talk about reducing the numbers because, although we live in a rural area where the few neighbours we have also have poultry and don't care about the roosters crowing, we end up with far too many roosters which overworks the girls. We sent some of the boys to an animal refuge where they were rehoused - but not for eating (some people don't mind, but that's just a little quirk of ours). But the numbers keep growing. Two broodies (both pure black - one bantam, one normal size) have recently produced between them eleven more gorgeous chicks - including black & white, pure white, grey and partridge. Time will tell what happens to them. They may stay, especially if they are girls, but I think we have reconciled ourselves that any of the boys, no matter how cute will have to go.

    In the meantime, we have started breeding pekins, silkies, wyandottes and araucanas, all of which have their own separate pens and runs. I do not, and will not, get into showing any of them. Not because my silkies are only pet quality, which probably some are although some extras that I purchased - for new blood - are apparently 'show quality'. I have no idea what "show quality" is and not interested in finding out. My bantams are only bred as pets for ourselves and children. Potential buyers come here and select the ones they want. I have a few customers who aren't worried if they have roosters so will get them very young and take pot luck. Others will wait until we can sex them, not that I'm an expert on that. Most of my wonderful customers become friends and send me photos of their kids with the birds and keep me updated on their progress. I also donate pekin girls to an Aged Care Facility in the nearest city as therapy birds for their Altzheimer patients. As the Wyandottes and Araucanas mature and breed, I will undoubtedly sell some of their offspring or fertile eggs. Who knows?

    So, that was the long story. In short - there is no goal. We have not set out with a plan to "cross breeds". They are all beautiful and we love all our birds whether 'pure bred' or not. A chook is a chook is a chook. They either lay eggs or crow.

    ADDITION: I would just like to add something that my husband raised and that is that while we don't show our birds, a few of our customers have with some of our silkies winning prizes. It's just that we lost faith many decades ago when we used to breed German Shepherds. When our vet pronounced that our dog was the best in North Queensland and should be shown, he also told us of some of the nasty things that occurred during the shows so we declined to become involved. Many of our puppies were later shown by their new owners and quite a few won prizes. While I am not suggesting the same atmosphere would be found at poultry shows, we simply have no interest but wish all those entering the best of luck, especially with our babies!!
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2016

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