SLWyandotte Pullet Pale and Quiet

Momplus1

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You really do have a lot to sort through. So, what I would do is nothing for the time being except watch closely for any "off" behavior. Getting a poop sample tested is called for if you suspect parasites, coccidiosis or a bacterial infection. It may be premature to suspect these after finding the smashed eggs.

A hen can have an occasional thin shell egg and it won't be a problem unless it becomes a chronic thing. Then you need to snoop in the nest boxes to try to figure out who is having this issue. It's the only way to resolve it without treating all the hens, which is not practical.

If you have a suspicion who the hen is, you can verify it by placing her in a crate inside for a couple of days to see what sort of egg she lays. Then you will know it's the right hen to treat if you get a collapsed egg. The treatment is one calcium tablet per day until the eggs become normal.

Laying soft eggs and thin shell eggs as a chronic issue is risky for the hen as eventually one of these eggs can collapse inside and then you risk infection and also need to help her expel the remnants.

Is this any help? Ask more questions, if not.
Yes this is very helpful. I do feel like I should add that I have noticed another Pullet with dirty butt feathers. Does this change anything? Just in case it's helpful at all, my 5 big girls consists of 2 SLWyandotte's, 2 Barred Rocks, and 1 Buff Orpington. The other Wyandotte, "Fashion", is the other pullet with dirty butt feathers. The 2 Barred Rocks are the only 2 out of this flock to NOT experience dirty BUTTS (not sure if the fluffy feathers in the other breeds are notorious for being messy or not). Right after Thanksgiving, 2 of my 3 boys had messy bottoms and I only mention this because the boys sleep in the girls run at night, but they're ALWAYS separated by something, whether it's the run Door or fencing when they free range. I clipped the boys feathers and figured the kitchen scraps my neighbors shared with them was the culprit. Back to the big girls, all 5 seems to be moving around like normal and dust bathing. We've had a very mild winter up until last night, today and throughout the next couple of days. We're experiencing lows of mid 20's and highs of upper 30's, which isn't that bad to many, but it did seem sudden for my birds.
 

Momplus1

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If this still seems like something I should probably just carefully watch for now, would you advise that I do a mail in sample for fecal float, just in case? If so, is there a way to mix samples from multiple birds and still get accurate results? They've not been wormed, or treated for anything other than coccidia, which was more of a better safe than sorry idea.
 

Momplus1

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Also, as I didn't finish up cleaning in time last night, they hung out on the roosting bar in the run. I did check that bar for any mites and didn't find anything. I also looked very closely to the walls and bars in the coop once I locked them up and didn't see anything.
 

azygous

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Dirty butt feathers all on its own isn't reason to get alarmed. It's when you notice the "off" behavior that you will know you need to try to figure out what's going on. That's when I begin with a poop sample taken to a lab. Yes, you can collect random flock samples and have those tested.

Besides a fecal float test for parasites, you can also request a gram stain test to identify bacteria that may be out of control. It's more expensive, but you get lots of actionable info. Knowing what bacteria is in the gut that is overwhelming the chicken enables you to select the right antibiotic.

Often a bacteria can be present in the flock but it can affect one chicken that is more susceptible. Depending on the bacteria, you may be treating the whole flock, but more often, it's one chicken that will be sick.
 

Momplus1

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My apologies, I'm not adding more and more on purpose. I'm just trying to share as much as possible to give you the clearest picture. I've always been one that just can't seem to summarize anything and draw it out much further than necessary. Please overlook that :idunno I am so grateful to you for everything.
 

Momplus1

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Dirty butt feathers all on its own isn't reason to get alarmed. It's when you notice the "off" behavior that you will know you need to try to figure out what's going on. That's when I begin with a poop sample taken to a lab. Yes, you can collect random flock samples and have those tested.

Besides a fecal float test for parasites, you can also request a gram stain test to identify bacteria that may be out of control. It's more expensive, but you get lots of actionable info. Knowing what bacteria is in the gut that is overwhelming the chicken enables you to select the right antibiotic.

Often a bacteria can be present in the flock but it can affect one chicken that is more susceptible. Depending on the bacteria, you may be treating the whole flock, but more often, it's one chicken that will be sick.

Like the case when you @azygous and @Wyorp Rock saved Amelia Bedila!!! You two are the very best and I owe you so much for the help you both provided! That still swells my heart when I think about you guys saving her life. I am forever grateful
 

Momplus1

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Thank you again for your help. I collected 3 eggs from the 5 pullets today. I will keep an eye on every one. Besides, just 3 or 4 days ago, I did get 5 nice eggs from them. I will continue with no treats (except for mash which isn't a treat, but don't tell my birds that, hahaha) and leave the feed, oyster shell and grit as usual. Thank you again for your time and your help. I truly treasure you
 

Momplus1

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I also need to thank you for talking me down as I had 5 halves of Tums ready to give my girls. I imagine all 5 girls do not need that much extra calcium. In case you haven't noticed, in times of stress with my daughter and/or my birds, I tend to go a bit overboard :eek:
 

azygous

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It's so much easier and enjoyable to help a sick chicken when the chicken care giver provides as much information as possible. Believe me, it's easier and faster to pick out the salient info from big pile of info than to try to drag the information out of the thread starter. It's a pleasure to work with you.

Right now, I don't believe you have a crisis on your hands. Just keep a close watch on those little feathered friends of yours. If something isn't right, you will spot it.
 

Wyorp Rock

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:hugs I agree with Carol. I would keep a watch on her. If she's been struggling with some soft shelled eggs then this may be why she seems a little off.

I think you can send a mixed sample to the lab for testing. Call them and ask. Raleigh is the closest to you? We also have a lab in Monroe as well (plus 2 more).
 
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