Small backyard pond keeps filling with water...without rain! Any ideas? (pics)

Discussion in 'DIY / Self Sufficiency' started by The Great Ayam, Mar 25, 2016.

  1. The Great Ayam

    The Great Ayam Out Of The Brooder

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    Nov 15, 2015
    I have been working on a small backyard pond for some time now. It's about 4 feet at its deepest. I am not completely finished with it yet, and now I'm noticing something.
    There is clay at the deepest part. About a foot of rain has collected. I bucketed the water out TWICE...and both times I returned the next day to find all the water had returned...without any rain.
    Any ideas?
    I do not believe it is spring fed because it was dry when I was digging. Possibly ground water trapped above the clay?
    Anyone else ever have a similar experience?


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    Last edited: Mar 25, 2016
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  2. Vosh Sahaal

    Vosh Sahaal Out Of The Brooder

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    Oct 1, 2015
    You have created a shallow well.
     
  3. BBQJOE

    BBQJOE Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Void where prohibited.
    And this is a problem?
     
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  4. The Great Ayam

    The Great Ayam Out Of The Brooder

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    LOL, BBQJOE. I'm just curious about the science behind the reappearing water. But yes I do want water in it... Just when I'm finished with the project. I have to keep emptying it to work on it. Just curious about the source of the water.
     
  5. Vosh Sahaal

    Vosh Sahaal Out Of The Brooder

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    It's groundwater. Apparently you have a high enough water table you managed to dig a well.
     
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  6. twisted-acres-farm

    twisted-acres-farm Maiah and daughter dob aug 2, 2017 Premium Member

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    TRY hard to not puncture the clay bottom!! or the water will drain away and could continue to do that when you want it filled. You could also use a small sump pump to work on keeping it dry until your project is completed
     
  7. The Great Ayam

    The Great Ayam Out Of The Brooder

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    Thanks for all the responses. I appreciate it. This is an unexpected yet interesting situation in this project.
     
  8. wyoDreamer

    wyoDreamer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    You haven't given us much info to go on.
    There is a site online that you can check to see the soil types for your area - that may help. It may show that you have clay lenses with perched water, a shallow water table, or you may even a leaky city watermain.
    Where are you located? where is the pond - is it in a low spot in the yard? is it downhill from you or your neighbors septic?
     
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  9. fishpondcoating

    fishpondcoating Just Hatched

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    Yes it's groundwater and you can overcome this situation by using Pondpro2000 which protect the pond from leaks and damages. It becomes a shield between water and pond and secures it from all extreme weather or temperature worst conditions. Thanks
     
  10. NorthTexasWink

    NorthTexasWink Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I live with clay soils. When I was landscaping and considering my proposed pond placement, I researched underground water flow mechanics and how to control the groundwater. I'd already built some berms, as I'm on a slope. I learned the berms "bank" some of the groundwater/runoff and slowly release it downhill. The clay subsoil acts as a barrier, keeping most of the water near the surface. I also have a "seep spring" on my property. It isn't a true spring, but is where the accumulated runoff and excess ground water is naturally directed to leak out by the underground formations of rock and clay that make up the large ridge that my property sits on the side of. Hope that makes sense. I've harnessed that outflow of water towards my plantings and and my pond system to help everything stay well watered even during a prolonged dry spell.

    Keeping your clay layer intact can save you much labor and expense when trying to seal your pond enough to keep it filled. If you can work with it, I think you'll be happier keeping it natural. You can also learn to direct your pond overflow in ways that benefit you and save water. Good luck! It looks like you've got a good start.
     

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