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Snake People!! I got some Q

Discussion in 'Random Ramblings' started by LeBlackbird, Sep 21, 2009.

  1. LeBlackbird

    LeBlackbird Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,231
    36
    213
    Aug 17, 2009
    SE Pennsylvania
    Hi, I want a snake. But I got some Q to ask.

    1. What kinds of snake are mellow, well mannered? (corn snake?)

    2. When do I feed it, What does it eat?

    3. What kinds are small? (so it dosen't eat my guinea pig?)

    4. Where do I get one from?

    Thanx a Ton!! [​IMG]
     
  2. tonini3059

    tonini3059 [IMG]emojione/assets/png/2665.png?v=2.2.7[/IMG]Luv

    Nov 6, 2008
    Southwestern PA
    1. What kinds of snake are mellow, well mannered? (corn snake?) I like my boas they are pretty mellow, so is my ball python, it is all in how often you handle them

    2. When do I feed it, What does it eat? I feed mine frozen thawed Rat/Mice/Rooster chicks/Quail depending on the snake

    3. What kinds are small? (so it dosen't eat my guinea pig?) Corn, Hog nose are fairly small I like the bigger ones they seem to be more docile in my opinion.

    4. Where do I get one from? I like to go to reptile shows they are more properly taken care of and you can ask the breeder tons of questions and get good answers rather than a pet store

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Sep 21, 2009
  3. HorseFeathers

    HorseFeathers Frazzled

    Apr 2, 2008
    Southern Maine
    The milk snake I caught grew from a fighter/biter into the sweetest snake ever in the space of a month. I expect corns are the same, and not too big. Though you'd probably want to keep it in a tank anyway, to avoid accidents and escapes. Those buggers hide! The food depends on the type of snake- corns eat pinky mice, I think. Most pet stores (try Petco) offer an array of reptiles, check there.
     
  4. Epona142

    Epona142 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Apr 19, 2008
    Bedias, TX
    Quote:1. Ball Pythons are pretty mellow. Sand boas are great too. I recommend starting with something that stays small. Corns CAN be mellow, but on the whole, colubrids are more "wriggly"

    2. Average of once a week, a suitable prey item.

    3. Ball pythons, sand boas. Also, why would the snake eat your guinea pig? A responsible owner never allows the animals to interact in any way, so this should not even be an issue.

    4. The first thing you should do is join a reptile forum. I recommend ball-pythons.net a GREAT place for you to start learning, and there are some very helpful people who will help you make a choice.

    Good luck.
     
  5. LeBlackbird

    LeBlackbird Chillin' With My Peeps

    3,231
    36
    213
    Aug 17, 2009
    SE Pennsylvania
    Quote:I just want to be safe rather than sorry, and I really don't have room for a large snake.
     
  6. lakeshorenc

    lakeshorenc Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Jan 14, 2009
    Lake Waccamaw NC
    I had a Green snake that lived on our chandelier for a couple years. I guess he ate the bugs that flew to the light. You could probably could put it in an aquarium and feed it crickets???
    I caught him in my yard.
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2009
  7. Iowa Roo Mom

    Iowa Roo Mom Resistance Is Futile

    Apr 30, 2009
    Keokuk County
    The first thing you need to do is buy a good book. Narrow down your choices, and go to your local library, or if you cannot get a book, get online (but be absolutly sure the website you are looking at is sound and reliable, because there are so many that are not)
    I reccomend a ball python. They are docile, thick bodied, and easily handled- if you get a CBB (captive born/bread) from a reliable breeder. Go to a herp show if you'd like to see the difference in the various snakes. But snakes are a commitment- husbandry is important- proper humidity, temp, cage set up, etc. Feeding in a seperate cage so the snake does not associate your hand coming into his/her house with food is important, also. So research is a must!!!
    I've been keeping snakes for over 10 years and I love it. But remember, be careful, no matter what you get remember this, anything with a mouth can bite!!! (Although my ball never tried)

    ETA: I can't stress enough... RESEARCH, RESEARCH, RESEARCH!!! Oh, and once you've made your choice, HAVE FUN, it's totally addicting!!!
     
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2009

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