sneaking day old chicks under a broody

Discussion in 'Raising Baby Chicks' started by 8littlechickens, Jul 23, 2010.

  1. 8littlechickens

    8littlechickens Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 20, 2010
    I've got a Welsummer who's been broody for a couple months and no sign of stopping (though she comes out of her own accord much more than she used to, but is looking more scraggly than before). So I'm thinking about sneaking some day old chicks under her to see if that works. I'm new to this, so I've got some questions:

    Do I need to sneak them under her in the middle of the night? Should I somehow separate her out of or within the big coop? Can they be any breed? Will it be clear if the Welsummer is taking care of the chicks or not/what should I look for? Any general tips from those who have done this before?

    Thanks!
     
  2. kjk

    kjk Out Of The Brooder

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    I just did this with two different broodies. I did it the morning the chicks arrived. You need to sit there and watch her and occasionally slip the chicks back under her. It might take a while to make sure mom and babies know what they are supposed to be doing (a few hours). Its well worth the initial effort IMO.
     
  3. oliviad51

    oliviad51 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I've done it once with 2 RIR Mommies. They both pecked the chicks for awhile, but took them in after a few hours. Just don't give up!
     
  4. 8littlechickens

    8littlechickens Out Of The Brooder

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    Apr 20, 2010
    So it's ok if she knows I'm putting them in there? And do I need to keep them separate from the rest of the flock? (And if so, for how long?)
     
  5. Knight Hawk Ranch

    Knight Hawk Ranch Chillin' With My Peeps

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    My friend just did this with a persistant broody. She bought couple of chicks from the feed store that were probably about a week old. Just after dark, she put them under her. Come morning, they were a happy family.
     
  6. kjk

    kjk Out Of The Brooder

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    mine are both in with the rest of the flock
     
  7. Cavendish Chickens

    Cavendish Chickens Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I was wondering about this topic too. I have a pair of speckled sussex, and have people who may want to incubate with their kids as an experiment but not keep the chicks, and I wasn't sure how I could get them back in the coop with the parents. What about the Rooster? If the hen is running around with chicks, would he hurt the chicks, or leave them be?
     
  8. KDOGG331

    KDOGG331 Flock Master

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    im not too sure about this as ive never tried it, but, i agree with the others, just slip em under her and watch them for a while, I think they should be ok...
     
  9. Nostalchic

    Nostalchic Chillin' With My Peeps

    It might work best if you do it at night. Also, if she's starting to come outside/off the nest more than before, it may be that she is - how would you say? 'recovering' from her broody state, and it may be that she won't take them on. I'd be prepared to watch carefully and take over if needed.
     
  10. ellend

    ellend Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I bought two one-day-old silkie chicks and slipped them under my broody Old English Game bantam, after sneaking her (sterile) eggs out. I did it after she went to sleep for the night. She looked mildly confused in the morning, but within a few hours was mother-of-the-year. We had the best forager Silkies ever![​IMG]

    Why risk doing it during the day? It only takes 2 minutes out of your evening or night, and she'll feel the babies for a few hours before she sees them, that way.[​IMG]

    The rooster--she doesn't need the additional stress, even if he DOESN'T bother the babies. And if he does...it's likely to be fatal. How about a nice, quiet, secure separate area just for Mom and chicks?
     

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