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Sneezing chickens, respiratory illness questions!

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by tezolt, Oct 20, 2014.

  1. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    I started treating my chickens with Valbazen two weeks ago for worms, and I noticed two roosters that I was given by someone that didn't want them had some sticky mucus in their mouths when I picked them up and had labored breathing but no rattling or wheezing. They are not tame like my hens so I had to chase then around a lot, and I was unsure whether or not that would cause the mucus. A while after treating I noticed my hens began sneezing and shaking their heads some, however there is no liquid coming out of their eyes or nostrils, no rattles, wheezing, coughing or gaping either, just a lot of sneezing in some individuals. I have been treating with VetRX and I think it may have helped some, but there are a few still sneezing, with one particular hen that looks very congested as her comb is now floppy and I can see in her face that she's a little more distressed than the others. Although, they all act completely normal and run about the yard besides the sneezing. When the roosters sneeze, it sounds somewhat more snotty while the hens squeek and sound congested. I also noticed one of the older hens I was given had somewhat of a manure smell to her, she's been in molt for a while now so could this cause somewhat of an odor or is this completely unrelated? It was coming from her body and not her nostrils as far as I could tell...

    I read that chickens do not get colds, however on the VetRX package it says for poultry with colds. I have also read that once chickens get a respiratory illness they're ruined if you are planning on introducing future chicks/pullets because they'll always be carriers since most respiratory problems are caused by viruses. Will this pass? Will I always have respiratory issues in my chickens now? Will I have to kill my present chickens to get new ones if I want to sell hatching eggs, chicks, or started pullets? These birds mean the world to me and I already have over $200 in medication and home remedies to treat the sick birds, I'd hate to cull any of them... I had 3 out of 4 hens I was given almost die to coccidiosis and one to a stressful worm infestation and molt this year already... now I'm stuck with this when my original hens were perfectly healthy... Please help! Thank you in advance!
     
  2. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I would contact your state vet, and ask how to get testing done on the sick birds. A necropsy can be done on a sacrified bird, also, but you need to find out if they are carrying infectious bronchitis, MG, or coryza. If it is IB, they will be carriers for up to a year if no birds are added, but if it is MG or coryza, they will be carriers for life. When adding new birds, they have to be quarantined for at least a month, so you can prevent the spread of these diseases. Sorry that you are dealing with this.
     
  3. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    Thank you for the help. Would I have to treat with an antibiotic to cure this or will they overcome it eventually if they aren't acting ill. I planned on being tested for NPIP before next spring so I will go ahead and try to set that up.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    Apr 3, 2011
    southern Ohio
    Viruses such as IB are not helped with antibiotics, but antibiotics can protect from secondary infections. Most respiratory diseases are never cured, but are chronic, and can reappear whenever there is stress. Antibiotics may help control symptoms, not cure the disease. Any chickens who have been around the sick ones including those who have never become sick will be carriers. That's how you can bring in a bird who appears healthy, but could be a carrier of MG, coryza< ILT, and others. NPIP doesn't always test for respiratory diseases, so you will need to ask since each state is different. NPIP was started to test for typhoid and pullorum. If I were you I would talk to the state vet since they are concerned about really bad diseases such as Newcastles and Avian Influenza--they might help you to get tested or at least, tell you how to get tested for MG or coryza. Here is a good link to read about the respiratory diseases and symptoms, plus another 2 just on MG:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    http://umaine.edu/livestock/poultry/mycoplasma-gallisepticum-faq/
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps034
     
  5. tezolt

    tezolt Out Of The Brooder

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    I found the name for a NPIP tester is PA a few months ago, I'll go ahead and call them. I am almost certain they test for MG. If they don't test for the others than I will call the state vet. Thank you very much.
     

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