Sneezing Chickens?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Ramblin Rooster, Dec 7, 2013.

  1. Ramblin Rooster

    Ramblin Rooster Hatchaholic

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    I have a couple chicken who will occasionally sneeze. Is this something to be worried about or are they ok? If it is a problem, how can I fix and prevent it?
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013
  2. Ramblin Rooster

    Ramblin Rooster Hatchaholic

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    Thank you in advance! [​IMG]
     
  3. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    It may be nothing but a reaction to dust or an ammonia odor in their environment, but it can sometimes be a symptom of respiratory disease. Usually with a disease, you will at least see some clear nasal secretions, but also can have bubbles or drainage in eyes, thick cloudy secretions from nose, swelling of face or eyes, rattles or wheezes, or sneezing. Here is a list of common diseases including respiratory ones: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
  4. Ramblin Rooster

    Ramblin Rooster Hatchaholic

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    They look perfectly normal @Eggcessive and its VERY dusty in there, I wouldn't be suprised if that's why. They dust bathe and get it all in their feathers then DUMP IT INSIDE THE BARN! [​IMG]D'oh! At least they aren't sick, and if their sneezing cause of dust that's their problem [​IMG]. And I just cleaned it too! D'oh! Chickens will be chickens [​IMG].

    Thanks for the help! @Eggcessive
     
  5. machuni

    machuni Out Of The Brooder

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    I second Eggcessive. I'd also make sure the coop has good ventilation because although it may not be an infection now, bad ventilation can lead to those things.
     
  6. Ramblin Rooster

    Ramblin Rooster Hatchaholic

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    [​IMG]
    It's in a horse barn, and they are in a horse stall, with lots of ventilation to inside the barn, but little to the outside directly. It would be difficult to cut a window or holes so what do you suggest I do? They have a chicken door, and there's the horse sized door in there stall too, should I open up on of those during the day? I usually do but during the winter it's been so cold I didn't want them to freeze to death. [​IMG]
     
  7. machuni

    machuni Out Of The Brooder

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    I'm a little confused. Do they stay within the barn all day? Are you talking about letting them out of the stall and roam around INSIDE the barn itself? Would you mind posting a couple of pictures? If so, I doubt there's that big of a temperature difference. As long as they or their coop are not wet and not exposed directly to the wind, I think it'd be safe to err on the side of more as opposed to too little ventilation.
     
  8. Ramblin Rooster

    Ramblin Rooster Hatchaholic

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    They are outside in their run ALL day, they just sleep in there. They spend little time in there, as they are always busy pecking around outside.

    This is the sheep's door, because I couldn't find any pics of theirs, but the chickens have the EXACT same one in their run, as well as a chicken door. We open the bottom, which is sort of hard to see here, and it makes a HUGE opening. It opens outside, to answer your question. My only concern is also we don't always get home in time to lock them up, which is why they have an automatic chicken door, so if this was always open they could be exposed to predators and/ or the elements.
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive True BYC Addict Premium Member

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    When they are in the coop at night the ventilation should be over their heads as high up as possible without direct drafts on them, to let out moisture in the winter preventing frostbite, and to let out hot air in the summertime. Vents can be made in the wood high up, covering t with hardware cloth to keep out predators. If they are getting fresh air during the daytime, that is good.
     
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2013

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