Sneezing/Coughing Pullets

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by Crystal8088, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. Crystal8088

    Crystal8088 New Egg

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    Apr 9, 2013
    Proctorville, Ohio
    Hello all,

    I have seven young 8 week old Barnevelders that I hatched who range with my adults. I purchased some 16-week birds recently, but had them in quarantine for a week before adding to the group, and they show no symptoms whatsoever.

    I have them all ranging during the day in a large, fenced yard, and they coop at night in a well-ventilated coop with pine shavings for litter. Two pullets have started sneezing over the last three days. They show no other symptoms other than being a little slower than the rest to come out of the coop in the morning. They eat and drink fine. They totter around the yard as usual. No discharge or runny eyes. I hung them upside down for a couple of minutes each to check for nasal discharges. Poop is normal. So far the only thing I've done is add vitamins to their water.

    I *think* it's just a cold, but I could use some reassurance. I plan to buy some VetRx today to treat them with. I want to use antibiotics as a last resort.

    Thoughts anyone?
     
  2. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    I would pull the sneezing pullets out of the flock immediately. Chickens don't get colds...they get respiratory diseases. Oftentimes it is a chronic respiratory disease that can render them an asymptomatic carrier, like mycoplasma gallisepticum. Mycoplasma can be transmitted from the mother hen through the egg to the chick. Chickens can pass the month-long quarantine and then infect a healthy flock.

    Sneezing can also be from environmental causes, like dust. But if they are acting a bit lethargic in the morning that is concerning.

    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
    diagnosis charts at bottom
     
  3. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    It sounds like a respiratory disease. You can try VetRX, but it has never worked for my birds when they had respiratory diseases. Definitely, isolate the infected birds, though, at this point, all of your birds have probably been exposed.

    If this is a viral disease, it will not respond to antibiotics; it will just go away on its own. Infectious Bronchitis is a common viral respiratory disease. Just keep the birds hydrated, well fed, and warm. Give them electrolytes and probiotics.

    A bacterial respiratory disease, such as Chronic Respiratory Disease, is just as probable as a viral one. Disease such as CRD will respond to antibiotics. Tylan50 or Tylan200 are the best antibiotics for respiratory diseases. I know that you don't really want to use antibiotics, but, speaking from experience, they are sometimes the only things that can save birds. It would be a good idea to keep Tylan50 or Tylan200 on hand, in case the disease gets worse. The dosage for Tylan50 is .5ccs for bantams, 1 ccs for large fowl, and for Tylan200, it is .1-.3ccs for bantams, and .5ccs for large fowl. Give this antibiotic for 3-5 days, once a day, injected into the breast muscle.

    It is likely that your birds will always be carriers of whatever disease they have. They will not show the symptoms all the time, but may show them during stress. They can still pass the disease on to other birds.

    I hope that I've helped; please keep us updated!
     
  4. chippysmom327

    chippysmom327 Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Nov 26, 2012
    Apollo, PA
    Mine is showing the same symptoms. She sounds like a baby with a cold. Gurgling sounds when she breathes. I'm starting VetRx today. I had her on ACV in her water yesterday. She doesn't seem any better so I'm giving her the VetRx.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2013
  5. Crystal8088

    Crystal8088 New Egg

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    Apr 9, 2013
    Proctorville, Ohio
    Well, I isolated her the other day but apparently too late. I'm hearing snuffling/sneezing sounds in the whole coop now. I think it's the infectious bronchitis since it came on so quickly. We brought some juvenile birds home from the fair and have kept them isolated, but I admit we cared for them all in the same clothes and with the same scoops and such. I didn't realize stuff was THAT infectious! I read that bronchitis is spread very easily and across large distances, and that the incubation period is rather short ... 2 days. I'm treating them all with Duramycin (that's all that is locally available) to combat any secondary infections and also just in case it's MG. I'm actually hoping it's bronchitis, not MG, even though bronchitis is more fatal. If they make it through bronchitis, it's gone after about 14 days and I can just clean the coop and not be afraid that it will be haunting us for years. MG sticks around and NEVER leaves, and is passed on to chicks via the egg!

    Thanks everyone for trying to help. Who knew back yard chicken husbandry could be so stressful??
     
  6. Crystal8088

    Crystal8088 New Egg

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    What gauge needle do you use? I found Tylan 50.
     
  7. mithious

    mithious Chillin' With My Peeps

    Just so you know, that is a young kid that you are taking advise from. I have no idea if they are right or wrong! There are some really good antibiotics that you can use and put in their water...I think the young un had to go to bed? I would research the water soluble ones, if it were me. I have no idea how or what size needle you would use. Nor have I heard other BYC members discuss this antibiotic or even administering drugs with a real needle. When they talk about a syringe, they mean the kind with no needle. For feeding and administering meds for the chicken/chick to drink. Just be careful if you do this kids' suggestion!
     
  8. ChickensAreSweet

    ChickensAreSweet Heavenly Grains for Hens

    http://www.shagbarkbantams.com/ib.htm
    here is an interesting article if you need it
     
  9. Wyandottes7

    Wyandottes7 Overrun With Chickens

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    For Tylan, you want to use a small needle. 22gauge is good, but 20gauge isn't bad either. Really, the only antibiotic(that i am aware of) that you need to use large needles with is Pennicilin.
     
  10. mithious

    mithious Chillin' With My Peeps

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