Sneezing & Nasal Discharge

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by mtlister, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. mtlister

    mtlister Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    BC, Canada
    I have a recently acquired BBRed OEGB pullet in the quarantine barn. I received her via a 5 hour drive on Thursday afternoon. Ever since she arrived I noticed a little bit of sneezing here and there, which I just assumed was because of the new shavings and dust, along with the stress of the trip. Friday and Saturday she developed a bit of wheezing and nasal discharge. I have not had her on any treatments besides a vitaboost I usually administer through the water for the first few days to help with stress. I'm not noticing any "fowl" smells associated with infectious coryza, the pullet doesn't seem to be lethargic eats & drinks normally. Not sure what to try treating her with. My local feed store has both "Gallimycin" and "Tetracycline" which say to be effective against CRD. Which would any of you recommend to treat with? Thanks.
     
  2. Judy

    Judy Moderator Staff Member

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    South Georgia
    Even if you treat and she improves, there is a good chance she will pass whatever she has to the rest of your flock if you expose them. The point of quarantine is not to allow such things into the flock.
     
  3. mtlister

    mtlister Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    BC, Canada
    Im still not even sure what she has exactly. Would like any advice or thoughts anyone has.
     
  4. lilchick

    lilchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    I would use Tylan for her symptoms. And keep her away from your other birds.

    Remember once your flock is infected it can be passed on thru the eggs.
     
  5. mtlister

    mtlister Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    BC, Canada
    No major updates as of late, just another observation I noticed lastnight. She seems to be scratching at her throat quite often. Are there any ways I can check for gapeworm? I've tried looking down her throat for any signs, but couldn't see any abnormalities. Maybe I just don't know what to look for? No more nasal discharge either, and never showed any signs of bubbly eyes, or facial swelling. Not quite sure, what I'm dealing with here. If only I had the extra money to take her to a vet and find out exactly what im dealing with here.
     
  6. mtlister

    mtlister Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    BC, Canada
    Video I took to possibly help in any diagnosis
     
  7. lilchick

    lilchick Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 23, 2008
    Williamsport In.
    She acts like she has a bit of congestion but other than that acts and looks very healthy. That "chirping" sound gives a good indicator. And scratching could be due to bit of congestion in nostrils and she is trying to clear it.

    If she were mine I would give her Tylan.

    If you are worried about worms of any type give her Ivermectin. Either drops on back of neck or if you use horse paste wormer give her a dab in her mouth. Good luck!

    I copied this out of a reference to poultry diseases..


    Infectious Bronchitis

    Synonyms: IB, bronchitis, cold
    Species affected: Infectious bronchitis is a disease of chickens only. A similar disease occurs in bobwhite quail (quail bronchitis), but it is caused by a different virus.
    Clinical signs: The severity of infectious bronchitis infection is influenced by the age and immune status of the flock, by environmental conditions, and by the presence of other diseases. Feed and water consumption declines. Affected chickens will be chirping, with a watery discharge from the eyes and nostrils, and labored breathing with some gasping in young chickens. Breathing noises are more noticeable at night while the birds rest. Egg production drops dramatically. Production will recover in 5 or 6 weeks, but at a lower rate. The infectious bronchitis virus infects many tissues of the body, including the reproductive tract (see Table 1 ). Eggshells become rough and the egg white becomes watery. (See publication PS-24, Egg Quality, for other causes of poor egg quality.)
    Transmission: Infectious bronchitis is a very contagious poultry disease. It is spread by air, feed bags, infected dead birds, infected houses, and rodents. The virus can be egg-transmitted, however, affected embryos usually will not hatch.
    Treatment: There is no specific treatment for infectious bronchitis. Antibiotics for 3-5 days may aid in combating secondary bacterial infections. Raise the room temperature 5°F for brooding-age chickens until symptoms subside. Baby chicks can be encouraged to eat by using a warm, moist mash.
    Prevention: Establish and enforce a biosecurity program. Vaccinations are available.
     
  8. mtlister

    mtlister Out Of The Brooder

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    Sep 6, 2011
    BC, Canada
    Thank you "lilchick" for keeping up with my thread. I have her on tetracycline right now, I will try to find a supplier or Tylan nearby otherwise I will have to order online. Thanks!
     

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