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Sneezing Rooster?

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by sbunn, Jan 15, 2017.

  1. sbunn

    sbunn Just Hatched

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    Jan 15, 2017
    SW Missouri
    I know I have seen other post about chickens who sneeze, wheeze, have runny noses, etc, but my rooster doesn't seem to have any other problem than sneezing and he will wheeze for the first few minutes in the morning until he gets going.

    This is what I have noticed about him: sneezes regularly, wheezes in the morning, clear eyes, stools are normal, eats/drinks normally. The rest of the flock are all normal and do not sneeze.

    We have already separated him from his flock. I use VetRx at night on him, and I have given him 1/2 cc IM for the last two days of Tysan 50.

    Any idea what is going on with the poor guy? I will take him to the vet if necessary.

    [​IMG]
     
  2. MasterOfClucker

    MasterOfClucker Chillin' With My Peeps

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    Welcome to BYC!

    Try to make him as stress free as possible.Tylan 50 should be given for five days.Some people have reported that there chicken got a respiratory disease when it was cold for a unknown reason.I think it happened to @Eggcessive .
     
  3. sbunn

    sbunn Just Hatched

    15
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    Jan 15, 2017
    SW Missouri
    Thanks @MasterOfClucker! Should I stick with the 1/2 cc dosage or up it to 1 cc?

    Also, do you remember what post it could be under for @Eggcellent?

    Also another update: He did a "gape" about two times in a row followed by a head shake. I'm assuming this is respiratory inflammation. Not sure if there is anything else to do with that beside the antibiotic right now. That was the first time he did this.
     
  4. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    No, I said that my hen gets watery or foamy eyes sometimes during very cold temperatures for part of the day. She doesn't ever seem to have any other signs of respiratory disease, such as sneezing, nasal secretions, or wheezing.
    I would give him 1 ml twice a day if he is 5 pounds or over, or 1/2 ml if he is under 5 pounds. Bantams get 1/4 ml. There are many different viruses and bacterial respiratory infections, and some are caused by mold fungus. It is hard to tell the difference in some of the viruses such as infectious bronchitis and milder strains of MG without testing through your local extension agent or state vet. Antibiotics won't treat viruses or fungal infections, but may help to treat secondary infections.
     
  5. sbunn

    sbunn Just Hatched

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    Jan 15, 2017
    SW Missouri

    Thank you! How long do you recommend removal from the flock? Until symptoms are gone?
     
  6. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    If he were terribly sick with pus and swollen eyes and horrible secretions coming from his nostrils I would definitely separate him until he is better. But since your guy is not that ill, and he probably had already exposed the others, I would keep him with his flock. Separation can be stressful on him, and he may need to be reintroduced if he is away for more than a few days, so another reason to put him back. You could always place him in a dog crate in view of the hens, and that way he is eating/drinking from his own feeder, and is easier to catch twice a day for medicine. Others may have different opinions of course. Feed him a tespoonful of plain yogurt for probiotics during and for a few days after the Tylan. Here is a good list I like of common respiratory diseases and symptoms, and look especially at infectious bronchitis, mycoplasma gallisepticum, coryza, ILT, and apsergillosis which are the most common respiratory diseases:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2017
  7. sbunn

    sbunn Just Hatched

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    Jan 15, 2017
    SW Missouri

    Awesome! If the ladies are okay without the crate, do you think it will be okay with a 100% reintroduced back into the flock? Or should I make sure he has a separate feeder and watered?
     
  8. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    I imagine they were all probably exposed at the same time, since many diseases are carried by wild birds coming around coops and waterers. Most resp. viruses are spread through droplets from sneezing, and through waterers, feeders, and poop.
     
  9. sbunn

    sbunn Just Hatched

    15
    5
    14
    Jan 15, 2017
    SW Missouri

    Thanks so much for your help! I haven't ever dealt with a sick chicken and feel like I have a million questions.

    Two last questions if you think you can help again: 1) Will my eggs still be okay to eat? And 2) Should I keep a closed flock and not bring any other chickens in?
     
  10. Eggcessive

    Eggcessive Chicken Obsessed Premium Member

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    There is no egg withdrawal with Tylan given orally. With injections, there is a 1 week withdrawal for eating the eggs. It might be a good idea to wait a year before new birds just in case it is infectious bronchitis, since birds can be carriers for up to 5 mo-1 year. If you every see any with swollen bubbly eyes, then that can be mycoplasma, and they can then be carriers for life. Many vets and experts seem to think that mycoplasma is pretty common in most backyard flocks. Many people here on BYC will have differing opinions on separation and closing a flock. If you ever lose one to a disease, it can really be useful to get a necropsy by your state vet, since that is the best way to identify a disease.
     

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