Sneezing/wheezing hen

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by MikaylaSD, Nov 9, 2014.

  1. MikaylaSD

    MikaylaSD Out Of The Brooder

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    May 29, 2014
    Central South Dakota
    I have a hen around 8 months old who I came to find this morning egg bound. There was a white egg in my best box before I got back out to check her, not 100% sure it was from today but when I checked her she didn't seem to have an egg lodged in her still. After that she went back to walking around normally with her tail up (still crying quietly) and she was eating and drinking fine but I did hear her sneeze a few times. Now two hours later she is wheezing heavily and sneezing every few minutes pretty violently. She has her tail back down but will walk a very short distance. Should I get some medication to put in her water? I have 4 hens, 3 of which are new to me because my neighbors dog broke through my fence and killed three of mine a few weeks ago. It's possible one was sick when I got her but I haven't noticed them acting weird. I live in South Dakota and the weather is just getting bellow freezing, so should I bring her inside until she is well? Any advice is appreciated.
     
  2. Ol Grey Mare

    Ol Grey Mare One egg shy of a full carton. ..... Premium Member

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    Oh goodness - given all the information it seems very likely you have brought an undesirable illness into the flock with the introduction of the new birds. You need to isolate the symptomatic bird and treat accordingly (you can go here https://www.backyardchickens.com/a/clinical-signs-for-common-respiratory-diseases-of-poultry to start narrowing down which illness you are dealing with) - and monitor the rest of the flock carefully Depending on the illness that you are dealing with it is possible your entire flock are now carriers.
     
  3. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    It's very possible your new birds brought along a respiratory disease. No way to know what exactly it is without having some testing done. The problem with respiratory diseases is that, while some are viral and some are bacterial, the risk of pneumonia and secondary bacterial infections is very high in both. So it is a good idea to give antibiotic's to help prevent that. Tylan is a good one, comes as an injectable or you can get the water soluble. For dosing just a few birds I think it's best to dose them directly rather then in the water. It's best if birds are kept warm as well, especially at night.

    Keep in mind that your bird will remain a carrier of whatever this is, anywhere from several months to the rest of her life depending on what this is, with the potential to infect any new birds you may get. Some of these diseases also pop back up frequently, others, like infectious bronchitis, may not show up again after the bird has recovered. If it turns into an ongoing problem you might want to consider getting one tested so you know what you are dealing with. An avian vet can run some blood tests to try to get you a diagnosis.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2014
    1 person likes this.
  4. MikaylaSD

    MikaylaSD Out Of The Brooder

    25
    1
    24
    May 29, 2014
    Central South Dakota




    Thank you both for the info. Where could I get Tylan? Should I give antibiotics to all of my hens? Is it ok to eat their eggs while they have an illness or are on antibiotics?

    Also, is it normal for a hen to be crying with her tail still down for a few hours after she was egg bound? I assume she just doesn't feel good.
     
  5. cafarmgirl

    cafarmgirl Overrun With Chickens

    Tylan 50 can generally be found at most any decent feed store as well as Tractor Supply. There is an egg withdrawal period just can't remember what it is off the top of my head. The dose is 1/2 cc for a standard size bird once a day for 3 to 5 days.

    As far as her crying after she laid her egg....without hearing what she's doing I don't really know what to think of it. Chickens in general will not make any kind of fuss when they don't feel well or are in pain, as prey animals it's totally against their nature to draw attention to themselves in that way. So I would tend to think her vocalizations are probably related to something else.
     
    1 person likes this.

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