Sneezy birds not responding to antibiotics (Duramycin/Tetracycline)

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by HenOnTheHill, Aug 19, 2013.

  1. HenOnTheHill

    HenOnTheHill Out Of The Brooder

    I have two pullets (1 four month old, 1 three month old) who both started sneezing and gasping several weeks ago. I had separated them from the rest of the flock and put them on Duramycin (almost 1/4 tsp per pint of water). Both started to get better, but now it has been 3 weeks and both are still sneezing, and depending on the day, still sound congested. One younger bird had periodically had "weepy" eyes through this, but the older bird never has. Both are eating, drinking and are relatively active. I've been feeding them yogurt in addition to pellets to help replenish their system. Their poop is normal with no signs of blood or other oddities.

    I know that it is recommended that the birds only go on antibiotics for 2 weeks, but I didn't want to let whatever they had win, so I kept them on for the 3rd week. I don't want to put them back into the rest of the flock until they are completely healthy (for obvious reasons), but the antibiotics just don't seem to be doing the trick. At this point though, I would love some advice or suggestions for what else to try or do.
     
  2. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    What happened to your birds is exactly what happened to one of my pullets when she was ill and I treated her with Duramycin (actually, it was Oxytetracycline, but they're the same thing, just under different names). During the first 5 days of treatment, she almost completely recovered. Then, she gradually got worse. I changed antibiotics, but two weeks of antibiotic treatment (she was on Penicillin before then) proved too much for her, and she didn't make it.

    The antibiotic that I suggest you try next is Tylan50 or Tylan200 injectable. It is a strong, but not dangerous, antibiotic used in treating respiratory diseases. It worked on my chickens when they were sick, with no lasting symptoms. Both Tylan50 and Tylan200 (the 200 version is the same thing, but more concentrated) can generally be found at a livestock supply store. They can be somewhat pricey antibiotics (my Tylan50 cost around $25.00), but it is still the best thing to try.

    The Tylan50 injectable (it also comes in an oral, water soluble form, but that doesn't work as fast/well) dosage is 1cc for large-fowl, .5ccs for bantams, injected into one side of the breast once daily for 5 days. The Tylan200 injectable dosage is .5ccs for large-fowl, .1-.3ccs (depends on the size) for bantams, injected into one side of the breast once daily for 3-4 days. Use a small gauged needle, and alternate the side of the breast that you inject into because Tylan can make the injection area sore. Do not give probiotics or dairy products during Tylan (or any antibiotic) treatment; however, vitamins are fine. Also, do not use Apple Cider Vinegar in the water.
     
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  3. HenOnTheHill

    HenOnTheHill Out Of The Brooder

    Ok, Thanks! I will try the Tylan50 next. This has been the week of the sick birds so far (I had a different batch pick up cocci). I've been getting a real education on chicken illnesses. SOOOO, I am not really sure how to best know where to inject the birds, mostly because I am worried about puncturing their crop or another internal organ or something else bizarre. I realize you are saying in the their breast, but they are still growing and aren't very plump yet. Am I just trying to get into muscle tissue?
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  4. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    Yes, you are just trying to get into muscle tissue. Some people inject into the thigh muscle, but the breast is preferred. Just make sure that you don't inject into a blood vessel, growing feather, breastbone, or the crop, and you'll be fine.
     
  5. HenOnTheHill

    HenOnTheHill Out Of The Brooder

    Ok, thanks. Last question: Since they are younger and right now are more the size of bantams than full sized standards, should I give them the lesser amount of .5cc? (Tylan50 is what I bought).
     
  6. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Tylan dosing info:
    [​IMG]

    Warning, can cause injection site muscle damage.

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  7. HenOnTheHill

    HenOnTheHill Out Of The Brooder

    I gave the two sick chicks the Tylan 50 tonight, with the assistance of my husband, who teaches biology and is a bird hunter, so he could help me inject the meds at the right spot. I gave each chick .7cc. The older chick seems ok, but sadly, the younger chick died a few moments after the injection. She seemed to have seizure like symptoms before passing. Did I over dose her? I feel horrible.
     
  8. casportpony

    casportpony Team Tube Feeding Captain & Poop Inspector General Premium Member Project Manager

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    Sorry for your loss, it was probably just the stress of being sick and being handled that did her in.

    Tylan 50 - There are 50mg in 1cc. According to the picture above, a 1kg (2.2 pound) bird gets no more than .8cc. (40mg/kg). How much do they weigh?
    1cc = 1ml

    -Kathy
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2013
  9. BantamLover21

    BantamLover21 Overrun With Chickens

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    I'm sorry for your loss.

    The same thing happened to one of my chickens when I dosed her with Tylan200. She was a bantam Wyandotte pullet, about 4 months of age. She had some sort of respiratory disease that manifested itself as a swollen ear, and then progressed to swelling of the sinuses and wattles. I at first thought that she had an ear infection, so I treated her with Penicillin. That didn't work, and her sinus infection became obvious, so I switched to Terramycin. She improved for about 5 days, and then got worse. Finally, I got Tylan200, and gave her one .2cc injection. Within an hour, she appeared to have trouble breathing, began having seizures, became too weak to stand, and died. I don't think that I overdosed her; I think that about two weeks of antibiotics, combined with her illness, finally killed her. The Tylan injection just added to those stresses, and it was the final straw.
     
  10. HenOnTheHill

    HenOnTheHill Out Of The Brooder

    Oh dear, Lyla, the smaller pullet, was probably only 1 lb. or so, she has always been smaller than her cohorts. So according to your calculations, I gave her twice the suggested dosage. Thank you for being kind, and maybe she would have died anyway, I just hate that this is a "learn the hard way" scenario.

    The older pullet, Giuli, is closer to two pounds. I need to give her a second shot tonight, and even though I am completely freaked, I am going to back the dosage down to .5cc.

    I also did more searching and read that some people just squirt it down the bird's throat. Of course this adds the possibility of getting it down the wrong pipe and into their lungs, so maybe that isn't any less risky.

    The other thing I was trying to figure out, and which is very frustrating, is that mg's cannot be converted to cc's because they measure different things. Based on my research, mg (milligrams) is a measure of mass and cc (cubic centimeter), as well as ml (milliliters), are measures of volume. Oh why does it need to be so confusing?!
     

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