Sneezy lethargic rooster

Discussion in 'Emergencies / Diseases / Injuries and Cures' started by chanamarie, Mar 20, 2017.

  1. chanamarie

    chanamarie Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 16, 2016
    I've read a lot of similar threads, but am feeling overwhelmed.

    I recently started work at a poultry farm and after about a week, I found out that the chickens needed to be treated because they had a respiratory issue. OK, fine. About a week or so later, my rooster started acting funny...lethargic, following the others, but keeping to himself a bit, fluffing up his feathers, and occasionally sneezing.

    I contacted our local Cornell Extension Agricultural Office who told me to go to Tractor Store and tell them the symptoms and they'd have something I could add to the water, etc and there were a few other directions to help him. He said it was exactly what a vet would give me. Of course TS had no idea what I was talking about. They had Tylan-50 (I think that's what it was called), but it was an injectable and for cows/pigs and couldn't give any advice about it.

    Now I'm hearing a few other sneezes from my flock (though everyone else still *looks* ok - not like the lethargic rooster). What should I do? The office I spoke to did suggest a vet, but if she's just going to give me the same thing that TS actually has, I'd rather do that first.

    Any ideas on how best to proceed? I am tempted to call the office back or to speak to the vet, but it irks me to spend hundreds of dollars on a vet visit if TS actually has what I want, but just don't know it.

    And any advice on preventing this in the future (as I now work at a poultry farm)? I have since bought separate shoes, but is there anything else I should do?
     
  2. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    I'm sorry you're having trouble.

    It sounds like whatever respiratory illness they have at the poultry farm was carried home to your flock. Did they give you the name of the illness they have?

    Your agricultural extension office may not be aware, but water soluable antibiotics are by prescription only (changes were implemented at the end of 2016). You would have to have a VFD or prescription in order to get these.

    You can use injectable Tylan50 - it can be given orally or by injection. Tylan 50 is commonly used for respiratory illness. Just be aware that antibiotics only treat any secondary infections, they won't cure respiratory illness. Most respiratory illnesses are contagious and even if your birds recover, they will be considered carriers of the illness for life. Injectable Tylan 50 dosage is 1 cc or ml per 5 pounds of weight. You can give it orally or as an injection into the breast muscle 1/4 inch deep.

    Having separate shoes is a good start for practicing bio-security between your workplace and home, but you also need to make sure you take off all clothes and launder them. Don't wear the same clothes when tending your flock or at work . Illness can be spread through dust, dander, wind, mucous, shoes, vehicle tires, etc., etc.

    Separate any sick birds that you have and only treat them. If they have any mucous or eye discharge, try to keep that cleared away. Offer your sick birds some poultry vitamins in their water and give them some extra protein like egg or tuna in addition to their normal feed. Make sure they are drinking well and staying hydrated.

    Keep us posted.

    Common illnesses in poultry:
    http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/ps044

    Bio-security measures:
    http://www.the-chicken-chick.com/2016/08/biosecurity-for-backyard-chickens.html
    http://www.fresheggsdaily.com/2012/07/backyard-biosecurity.html
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2017
  3. chanamarie

    chanamarie Out Of The Brooder

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    Mar 16, 2016
    Thanks for responding. So Tylan 50 is exactly what a vet would give me? Or would I still be better off contacting a vet?

    And does this mean that all birds I will ever have will be considered carriers (unless I were to completely cull this flock and start over)? I find that quite upsetting and wish I had been warned about the respiratory issues when I started! (Though it's my fault for not having started bio-measure right away).

    I was interested in the future (maybe distant future) in becoming NPIP certified. Would this make that impossible?
     
  4. Wyorp Rock

    Wyorp Rock Overrun With Chickens Premium Member

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    Sep 20, 2015
    Southern N.C. Mountains
    Every vet is different, so I don't know what they would prescribe for respiratory illness - it could be Baytril, Oxytetracycline or something else.

    Generally speaking - yes, any birds that have been ill and recover or those exposed to the sick birds would be considered carriers - even if they never show signs of illness. Depending on the illness, some people do cull, wait for a period of time then start over. I recommend that you have some testing performed to find out exactly what you are dealing with. State labs and independent labs can perform testing and give you that information.

    Actually I'm quite surprised that the poultry farm you work for does not have information and protocols in place for bio-security.

    Independent lab testing:
    http://www.zoologix.com/

    Necropsy and State labs
    http://www.metzerfarms.com/PoultryLabs.cfm
    http://www.usaha.org/Portals/6/StateAnimalHealthOfficials.pdf
    https://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahln/downloads/all_nahln_lab_list.pdf
     

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