So, are the roos...um...fertile all the time?

Discussion in 'Quail' started by FowlFriend, May 27, 2010.

  1. FowlFriend

    FowlFriend Out Of The Brooder

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    Feb 24, 2010
    Central Coast, CA
    My head-pecked roo is healing nicely but is crowing constantly. However, the one who pecked him is not. I did a hiney check and saw that the injured roo has the foamy stuff, so I put him with the 2 hens I have. So, here's my question: Is he going to crow and want to mate all the time, until he dies?

    And what about the other roo who doesn't have the foam? They're both 3.5 months old. Will he get foamy and start crowing, too? Or does this happen only if he sees the girls?

    My quail sex knowledge is pitifully poor![​IMG]
     
  2. chickenwhisperer

    chickenwhisperer Chillin' With My Peeps

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    May 29, 2007
    Chicken Country, U S A
    Quote:I could think of worse ways to go . . . [​IMG]
     
  3. missred871

    missred871 Eggxhausted Momma

    May 5, 2010
    Perry GA
    well u didnt say what kind of quail but I am assuming courtnix. If so, there is a breeding season they will usually stop mating in Sept. unless you keep them with 14 hours of light a day. Then they may continue to lay and mate. If your other male is the same age as the injured male and doesnt have any foam at all then that means he is less fertile. The more foam the better the fertility of the male. So I would say keep the females with whichever male is the most fertile. The other guy is seemingly worthless for mating if you want fertile eggs. Hope that helps you
     
  4. FeatheredObsessions

    FeatheredObsessions Chillin' With My Peeps

    May 24, 2010
    Oregon
    They will be fertile as long as they are in breeding quality. In the winter months their reproductive cycle is slowed down by the changing of the seasons. If kept under artifical light you can stimulate their reproductive cycles by tricking it to believe it is summer or spring with lond day cycles.
     

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